North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Greene, Ronald (1891-1961)

Ronald Greene (May 11, 1891-October 11, 1961) numbered among the leading architects during Asheville's architectural heyday of the 1910s and 1920s and is best known as the designer of the mountain city's first skyscraper—the slender, Gothic Revival style Jackson Building (1923-1924). During a long and distinguished career, he frequently took advantage of local publications...

Harbison, Philo G. (1856-1957)

Philo G. (Gaither) Harbison (1856-1957) was a prominent African American carpenter and contractor in Morganton, N. C. during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. According to Suzanne Pickens Wylie's Jonesboro Historic District National Register of Historic Places nomination, Harbison was born into slavery in 1856 but resided in his owner's house and learned...

Hartge, Charles E. (1865-1918)

Charles E. Hartge (September 1, 1865-October 25, 1918), a German-born architect originally named Carl Emil Hartge, designed many churches, schools, and other buildings in central and eastern North Carolina around the turn of the 20th century. After coming to the United States in 1882, he settled in Tarboro by 1888, when he applied for...

Hartmann and Hartmann (1946 -1960s)

The firm formally known as Charles Hartmann, Architects, was formed about 1946 by the established Greensboro architect Charles C. Hartmann and his son, Charles Conrad Hartmann, Jr. The elder Hartmann had moved from New York to Greensboro in the early 1920s and established a successful practice. His son worked with him for a time...

Hartmann, Charles C. (1889-1977)

Charles Conrad Hartmann (1889-December 31, 1977), architect, moved from New York to Greensboro in 1921 to design the Jefferson Standard Building and established a prolific and long-lasting practice. In the mid-1940s he formed the practice of Charles C. Hartmann, Architects, with his son Charles C. Hartmann, Jr., a firm herein referred to as Hartmann...

Hayden, Wheeler, and Schwend (1899-1900)

The architectural firm was formed in 1899 in Charlotte when Oliver Duke Wheeler and Luke Hayden of Hayden and Wheeler took Louis E. Schwend as partner. Schwend died in November 1900. This was one of a series of partnerships formed by Wheeler. For the firm's operation and selected building list, see the entries for...

Hook, Charles Christian (1870-1938)

One of the first leaders in the state's early 20th century architectural profession, Charles Christian Hook (February 18, 1870 - September 17, 1938) moved to Charlotte as a young man in 1890 and practiced in the "Queen City" for the rest of his long career. He was Charlotte's first fulltime professional architect, and one...

Houser, William H. (ca. 1841-1912)

Born into slavery in South Carolina, brickmason and brickmaker William H. Houser (ca. 1841-1912) exemplifies the African-American artisans striving for economic success and community identity in the decades after the Civil War in a career that spanned years of opportunity and oppression. Trained in a trade long associated with free and enslaved black workmen...

Howe Family (fl. 1850s-1900s)

The Howe Family of Wilmington, North Carolina, encompassed at least four generations of men of color active in the city's building trades. As traced in Strength Through Struggle, they included Anthony Howe (d. 1837) and his sons Anthony (ca. 1807-after 1870), Pompey (d. by 1869), and Alfred Augustus (1817-1892); Anthony's sons Anthony Jr. (dates...

Hunt, Reuben H. (1862-1938)

Among the most prolific architects in the country, Reuben H. Hunt (1862-May 27, 1938) designed hundreds of religious, educational, and commercial buildings in every state from Virginia to Texas. Although his home office was in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Hunt had satellite offices in Jackson, Mississippi and Dallas, Texas. He was especially known for his designs...

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