North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Moore, Solon B. (1872-1930)

Solon B. (Balias) Moore (May 17, 1872-January 16, 1930) practiced architecture in Wilson for more than twenty years, briefly with Charles C. Benton, Sr., in 1910-1915 and then for sixteen years on his own. Arriving early in Wilson's emergence as the leading bright leaf tobacco market in America and one of the wealthiest towns...

Nash, Arthur C. (1871-1969)

Arthur Cleveland Nash (October 21, 1871-September 26, 1969), a Beaux-Arts trained New York architect, designed many buildings in North Carolina and is best known as campus architect for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the school's major expansion in the 1920s. There he worked in association with the consulting firm of...

Parker, Charles N. (1885-1961)

Charles N. (Newton) Parker (October 29, 1885 -July 30, 1961), architect, practiced in Asheville for many years and is best known for the Grove Arcade complex built at the height of the city's pre-Depression boom era. A native of Ohio, he came to Asheville as a young man in 1900 and spent his career...

Peeps, William H. (1868-1950)

William H. Peeps (March 3, 1868-September 10, 1950), an English-born architect, was a key figure in Charlotte's early 20th-century development into a regional business hub and center of architectural activity. Working in a variety of styles and with an elegant and restrained touch, Peeps designed some of the city's finest downtown buildings as well...

Reynolds, Frank W. (1868-1951)

Frank W. Reynolds (1868-1951), a mill designer and engineer born and raised in Rhode Island, worked throughout his long life for the large engineering and architectural firm of Lockwood, Greene, and Company. The firm employed many men, and Reynolds was involved in many roles and in many projects. Most notable for North Carolina is...

Rose, William P. (1870-1952)

William Preston Rose (1870-1952), architect and contractor, designed and constructed many buildings large and small in eastern and central North Carolina. A native of Johnston County, he typified the fluidity of the building professions during his long career. He began as a carpenter, then emerged as a self-taught architect in the late 1890s. About...

Sayre and Baldwin (1909-1915)

The architectural partnership of Sayre and Baldwin (1909-1915) was established in 1909 in Anderson, South Carolina, by Christopher Gadsden Sayre (1876-1933) and James J. Baldwin (1888-1955). In 1914 the firm opened a branch office in Raleigh. In 1915 the two men dissolved the partnership and entered on prolific independent practices. Although a substantial portion...

Sayre, Christopher Gadsden (1876-1933)

Christopher Gadsden Sayre (November 21, 1876-October 12, 1933) was a South Carolina architect who had extensive work across North Carolina for many years, in partnership with James J. Baldwin and on his own. Although his practice encompassed many types of buildings, he was best known for his public school designs, which included some of...

Schwend, Louis E. (1875-1900)

Louis E. Schwend (1875-Nov. 24, 1900) was an architect from Ohio who was briefly a member of the prolific architectural firm of Hayden, Wheeler, and Schwend. Although his career was brief, he is noteworthy for having planned the 1899 Iredell County Courthouse, which formed the popular prototype for a series of similar courthouse designs...

Shreve and Lamb (1924-1970s)

The firm of Shreve and Lamb, which became Shreve, Lamb, and Harmon in 1929, gained a world-wide reputation as the designers of the one of the most famous buildings in the world: the Empire State Building (1929-1931). The firm is best known in North Carolina for their R. J. Reynolds Building (1927-1929) in Winston-Salem...

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