North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Andrews, W. S. (fl. 1850s)

W. S. Andrews (fl.1850s), architect, from Columbus, Ohio, appeared briefly during the antebellum railroad growth era in the North Carolina Piedmont. He advertised in the Greensboro Patriot of September 17, 1858, that he was "prepared to furnish plans and drawings for Public Buildings, Villas, Cottages, etc." In his advertisement, he cited as references such...

Armfield, G. Will (1849-1927)

G. Will (George Williamson) Armfield (1849-1927) was a Greensboro architect and contractor in the early 20th century, who had spent his younger years as a merchant before embarking on a new career in construction about 1900. Although there are numerous contemporary references to his building projects, especially residences, only a few of his works...

Barton, Harry (1876-1937)

Harry Barton (June 17, 1876-May 9, 1937), a native of Philadelphia, moved to Greensboro in 1912 and became a leader in that city's and the state's architectural profession during the early 20th century, planning numerous important buildings and taking an active role in the American Institute of Architects in North Carolina. Harry Barton was born...

Boyer, Martin E., Jr. (1893-1970)

Martin Evans Boyer, Jr. (July 22, 1893-February 17, 1970) was a long-lived and prominent architect in Charlotte best known for his residential architecture of the first half of the twentieth century, primarily in the city's most prestigious suburbs. He is considered by many to be Charlotte's preeminent revivalist architect. Boyer was born in Glen Wilton...

Brewer, W. L. (1862-1956)

W. L. Brewer (September 9, 1862-September 5, 1956), a Greensboro architect, numbered among the original chapter members of the new North Carolina chapter of the American Institute in 1913 (see Glenn Brown). He was also #5 among the group of men licensed to practice architecture in North Carolina in 1915, based on their previous...

Davis, Alexander Jackson (1803-1892)

Alexander Jackson Davis (1803-1892), a leading American architect of the antebellum period, had an important series of commissions in North Carolina that were significant both in the development of the state and Davis's national practice. The monumental North Carolina State Capitol (1833-1840) was designed by the firm of Town and Davis, but his subsequent...

Deitrick, William Henley (1895-1974)

William Henley Deitrick (1895-1974) was a distinguished and prolific Raleigh architect for half a century, whose firm grew into one of the largest in the state, with projects from the coast to the mountains. Although he began his career in the Beaux Arts tradition and designed many buildings in revivalist styles over the years...

Epps, Orlo (1864-1926)

Orlo Epps (1864-1926) was one of Greensboro's principal architects around the turn of the 20th century. Like many architects and builders of his era, his practice encompassed every popular style of the day and a multitude of building types from houses to colleges to mills. During the 1890s in Greensboro, Epps was associated with...

Fellheimer and Wagner (1923-1940)

The New York architectural firm of Fellheimer and Wagner was established in 1923 by Alfred T. Fellheimer (1875-1959) and Steward Wagner (1886-1958) and gained fame for designing important American railroad stations in Beaux Arts and Art Deco styles. The firm planned at least two stations and a power plant in North Carolina in the...

Foulk, S. W. (1848-1932)

Sidney W. Foulk (1848-1932), often referred to as S. W. Foulk, was a native of Ohio who spent most of his career in New Castle, Pennsylvania. He developed an architectural practice that specialized in schools, churches, and YMCA facilities and reached into several states. He generally favored a robust Romanesque Revival style. In North...

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