North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

Coming Soon

NC Architects and Builders is a growing system. We will post this entry as soon as it is ready.

Your Search: Catherine Bishir : Guilford County : Fayetteville : 1900s

New Search:

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Sort by:

Bain, William Carter (1839-1920)

William Carter Bain (January 8, 1839- July 8, 1920) was a prolific and adaptable contractor who epitomized the energetic entrepreneurship of the post-Civil War well into the 20th century. Bain began as a small-town artisan, served in the Confederate army, and became a regional builder and manufacturer. Adapting successfully to changing times during a...

Barton, Harry (1876-1937)

Harry Barton (June 17, 1876-May 9, 1937), a native of Philadelphia, moved to Greensboro in 1912 and became a leader in that city's and the state's architectural profession during the early 20th century, planning numerous important buildings and taking an active role in the American Institute of Architects in North Carolina. Harry Barton was born...

Davidson, Berry (1831-1915)

Berry Davidson (February 10, 1831-December 21, 1915), a millwright in the central Piedmont of North Carolina, left an unusually complete narrative of a career that extended from the 1840s until after 1900, a key period in the industrial development of the region. Depicting a rural millwright's mobility, versatility, and adaptability, his account illuminates the...

Deitrick, William Henley (1895-1974)

William Henley Deitrick (1895-1974) was a distinguished and prolific Raleigh architect for half a century, whose firm grew into one of the largest in the state, with projects from the coast to the mountains. Although he began his career in the Beaux Arts tradition and designed many buildings in revivalist styles over the years...

Hartmann, Charles C. (1889-1977)

Charles Conrad Hartmann (1889-December 31, 1977), architect, moved from New York to Greensboro in 1921 to design the Jefferson Standard Building and established a prolific and long-lasting practice. In the mid-1940s he formed the practice of Charles C. Hartmann, Architects, with his son Charles C. Hartmann, Jr., a firm herein referred to as Hartmann...

Hook, Charles Christian (1870-1938)

One of the first leaders in the state's early 20th century architectural profession, Charles Christian Hook (February 18, 1870 - September 17, 1938) moved to Charlotte as a young man in 1890 and practiced in the "Queen City" for the rest of his long career. He was Charlotte's first fulltime professional architect, and one...

McInerney, Michael (1877-1963)

Michael Joseph Vincent McInerney (March 18, 1877-March 3, 1963), architect and designer, was a Benedictine monk and Roman Catholic priest at Belmont Abbey in Gaston County, North Carolina. Beginning with his design for St. Leo Hall (1906) at the Abbey, he developed a nationally important architectural practice that encompassed scores of Catholic churches, schools...

McMillen, Charles (1854-1911)

Charles McMillen (1854-1911), an Irish-born architect, was one of many mobile architects who worked in cities across America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Active in Duluth in the 1880s and 1890s, he moved to Wilmington, North Carolina, after winning a competition to design the port city's Masonic Temple in 1898. He...

Rose, William P. (1870-1952)

William Preston Rose (1870-1952), architect and contractor, designed and constructed many buildings large and small in eastern and central North Carolina. A native of Johnston County, he typified the fluidity of the building professions during his long career. He began as a carpenter, then emerged as a self-taught architect in the late 1890s. About...

Wheeler, Oliver Duke (1864-1942)

Oliver Duke Wheeler (May 21, 1864-October 27, 1942), was an architect who with his sequence of partners and associates—Luke Hayden, Louis E. Schwend, James M. McMichael, Neil Runge, D. Anderson Dickey, and others—had a long career in North Carolina and one of the state's most prolific practices of the day. Headquartered in Charlotte from...

Text Only

Brought to you by The NCSU Libraries and The NCSU Libraries Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center.

Please contact us with any additions, corrections, or updates.

Giving to the Libraries
0