North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Smith and Carrier

Trades:
  • Architect
NC Work Locations:
  • Asheville, Buncombe County
  • Buncombe
  • Black Mountain, Buncombe County
  • Buncombe
  • Montreat, Buncombe County
  • Buncombe
  • Flat Rock, Henderson County
  • Henderson
  • Hendersonville, Henderson County
  • Henderson
  • Sylva, Jackson County
  • Jackson
  • Marshall, Madison County
  • Madison
  • Bryson City, Swain County
  • Swain
Building Types:
  • Commercial;
  • Educational;
  • Fraternal;
  • Public;
  • Religious;
  • Residential
Styles & Forms:
  • Beaux-Arts;
  • Colonial Revival;
  • Gothic Revival;
  • Neoclassical Revival;
  • Renaissance Revival

Biography

Smith and Carrier, an Asheville architectural firm established in 1906 by Richard Sharp Smith (1852-1924) and Albert Heath Carrier (1878-1961), was among the most distinguished and prolific architectural firms in western North Carolina and did much to define the character of the mountain city of Asheville during its early 20th century era of rapid growth and architectural efflorescence.

Smith, a native of England, had come to Asheville in the 1890s as superintending architect at Biltmore and had already established his reputation by 1906, while Carrier, a native of Michigan, moved there with his family as a child in 1885 and as a young man gained valuable knowledge of construction by working with a family firm in Duplin County. By 1903 Smith was so busy that he needed a partner, and after some negotiation on terms (see entry for Albert Heath Carrier), the two formed their partnership in 1906.

The firm worked on more than 700 projects from its inception until Smith's death in 1924. Their notable works in Asheville included all building types, with the Legal Building (1909) and the Loughran Building (1923) among the most prominent early and late works. Landmarks beyond the city include the imposing, neoclassical Jackson County Courthouse and Madison County Courthouse. Among the architects employed by the partnership were Charles N. Parker from 1909 to 1913, who later practiced independently in Asheville, and Joseph D. Rivers from 1923-1924, who subsequently worked with William H. Lord in Asheville. After Smith's death, Carrier completed the projects underway but soon reduced his practice and essentially retired from the profession. For more information on both men and the firm, see their respective entries herein.

Author: Catherine W. Bishir.

Published 2012

Building List

Loughran Building (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1923

Contributors:
Dates: 1923
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: Haywood St. and Walnut St., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial

Loughran Building

Swain County Courthouse (Bryson City, Swain County)

Swain Bryson City

1908

Contributors:
Dates: 1908
Location: Bryson City, Swain County
Street Address: 101 Mitchell St., Bryson City, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).

Swain County Courthouse

Asheville Club (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1915

Variant Name(s):
  • Carolina Hotel;
  • Charmil Hotel
Contributors:
Dates: 1915
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 33-35 Broadway, Asheville, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial

William Jennings Bryan House (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1917

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1917
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 107 Evelyn Pl., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Fraternal Order of Eagles Building (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1914

Contributors:
Dates: 1914
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 73 Broadway, Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • David R. Black, Historic Architectural Resources of Downtown Asheville, North Carolina (1979).

Fraternal Order of Eagles Building

E. W. Grove Office (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1912

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1912
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 324 Charlotte St., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial

Hopkins Chapel A. M. E. Zion Church (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1910

Contributors:
Dates: 1910
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 21 College Pl., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious

Hopkins Chapel A. M. E. Zion Church

Legal Building (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1909

Contributors:
Dates: 1909
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 10 S. Pack Square, Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).
Note:

For this severely elegant building facing Pack Square, Smith employed one of the region's earliest uses of reinforced concrete structure. The postcard shows the Legal Building on the left.

Legal Building

Oates House (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1913

Contributors:
Dates: 1913
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 90 Gertrude Pl., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).
Note:

The unusually sophisticated house, built of fireproof concrete and stucco, was built for J. Rush and Dora Oates; he was vice-president of the Central Bank, for which Smith had also designed the Legal Building, of reinforced concrete. The postcard shows the Oates House in the upper right corner.

Oates House

St. Mary's Episcopal Church (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1914

Contributors:
Dates: 1914
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 337 Charlotte St., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

Smith's home church, St. Mary's is one of the state's few examples of a fully realized Anglo-Catholic church design; it follows a cruciform plan and includes a rood screen in the formally arranged interior.

St. Mary's Episcopal Church

Technical Building (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1910

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1910
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: College St., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • David R. Black, Historic Architectural Resources of Downtown Asheville, North Carolina (1979).

Zealandia (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1908

Variant Name(s):
  • Philip S. Henry House
Contributors:
Dates: 1908-1920
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 1 Vance Gap Rd., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).
  • Douglas Swaim, ed., Cabins and Castles: The History and Architecture of Buncombe County, North Carolina (1981).
Note:

For diplomat and art collector Henry, Smith designed a luxurious Tudor Revival stone mansion that rises out of living stone. Like many Asheville area houses, its design complements the mountain setting.

Zealandia

Lewis Funeral Home (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1921

Contributors:
Dates: 1921
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 189 College St., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • David R. Black, Historic Architectural Resources of Downtown Asheville, North Carolina (1979).
Note:

The building is now the Buncombe County Courthouse Annex.

George Tayloe Winston House (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1909

Contributors:
Dates: 1909
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 2 Howland Rd., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Breezemont (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1914

Variant Name(s):
  • Herbert Miles House
Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1914
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 150 Cherokee Rd., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).

Elks Home (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1915

Variant Name(s):
  • Hotel Asheville
Contributors:
Dates: 1915
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 55 Haywood St., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial

Elks Home

Scottish Rite Cathedral and Masonic Temple (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1913

Contributors:
Dates: 1913
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 80 Broadway, Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Fraternal
Images Published In:
  • David R. Black, Historic Architectural Resources of Downtown Asheville, North Carolina (1979).

Scottish Rite Cathedral and Masonic Temple

Locke Craig House (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1916

Contributors:
Dates: 1916
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 25 Glendale Rd., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Edwin L. Ray House (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1908

Contributors:
Dates: 1908
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 83 Hillside St., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Thomas Lawrence House (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1909

Contributors:
Dates: 1909
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 25 Lawrence Pl., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

InTheOaks (recreation wing) (Black Mountain, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Black Mountain

1919

Contributors:
Dates: 1919-1921; 1922-1923 [addition]
Location: Black Mountain, Buncombe County
Street Address: 510 Vance Ave., Black Mountain, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).
Note:

In 1922-1923, Smith and Carrier added a recreation wing.

Anderson Auditorium (Montreat, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Montreat

1922

Contributors:
Dates: 1922; 1941 [rebuilt]
Location: Montreat, Buncombe County
Street Address: 318 Georgia Ter., Montreat, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

The capacious, stone-walled auditorium at the Montreat campus has a 3,000-seat hall under a steel truss roof. It complements the massive stone Assembly Hall by architect William J. East. The Auditorium burned in 1940 and was rebuilt the following year.

Anderson Auditorium

Beaumont (Flat Rock, Henderson County)

Henderson Flat Rock

1839

Contributors:
Dates: 1839; 1909
Location: Flat Rock, Henderson County
Street Address: 121 Andrew Johnstone Dr., Flat Rock, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).
Note:

Smith supervised remodeling and enlarging the original 1839 stone house for Frank Hayne of New Orleans. This was one of several 19th century houses in the resort community of Flat Rock that were re-designed in the early 20th century.

Beaumont

People's National Bank (Hendersonville, Henderson County)

Henderson Hendersonville

1910

Variant Name(s):
  • Henderson County Bank
Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1910
Location: Hendersonville, Henderson County
Street Address: 225-231 N. Main St., Hendersonville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The building has been converted to commercial and residential space.

Kanuga Conference Center Cottages (Hendersonville, Henderson County)

Henderson Hendersonville

1908

Contributors:
Dates: 1908-1910
Location: Hendersonville, Henderson County
Street Address: Kanuga Conference Dr., Hendersonville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Recreational;
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).

Kanuga Conference Center Cottages

Jackson County Courthouse (Sylva, Jackson County)

Jackson Sylva

1914

Contributors:
Dates: 1914
Location: Sylva, Jackson County
Street Address: W. Main St., Sylva, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).

Jackson County Courthouse

Madison County Courthouse (Marshall, Madison County)

Madison Marshall

1907

Contributors:
Dates: 1907
Location: Marshall, Madison County
Street Address: S. Main St., Marshall, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, Michael T. Southern, and Jennifer F. Martin, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Western North Carolina (1999).
Note:

The postcard shows the Madison County Courthouse on the left.

Madison County Courthouse

Majestic Theater (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1912

Variant Name(s):
  • Paramount Theater
Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1912
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: College St. at Market St., Asheville, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

For a decade or so Smith and Carrier had their office on an upper floor of the building. The theater featured vaudeville acts as well as motion pictures. Family memory recalls that Carrier had a window cut in his office wall so he could watch performances. The firm subsequently moved to the Overland-Knight Building.

Overland-Knight Building (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1922

Variant Name(s):
  • Buncombe County Administrative Offices Building;
  • Three Mountaineers
Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1922
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: College St., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

This building, which was the last location of Smith and Carrier's offices, was fitted with Carrier Casement Adjuster windows.

Langren Hotel (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1908

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1908-1912
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: College St. at Biltmore Ave., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The building's construction history is complicated by a delay caused by financial problems. Although no architect is generally cited for it, the building was identified by A. H. Carrier to Joseph D. Robinson, Jr. as one the firm had been involved in. Further research may uncover documentation of the building's architects and builders.

Langren Hotel

Smith and Carrier's Work Locations

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