North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Leitner, Joseph F. (1871-1930)

Variant Name(s):
  • Joseph Florence Leitner;
  • J. F. Leitner
Birthplace: Augusta, Georgia, USA
Residences:
  • Augusta, Georgia
  • Atlanta, Georgia
  • Columbia, South Carolina
  • Wilmington, North Carolina
Trades:
  • Architect
NC Work Locations:
  • Chadbourn, Columbus County
  • Columbus
  • Whiteville, Columbus County
  • Columbus
  • Fayetteville, Cumberland County
  • Cumberland
  • Winston-Salem, Forsyth County
  • Forsyth
  • Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
  • Mecklenburg
  • Rocky Mount, Nash County
  • Nash
  • Wilmington, New Hanover County
  • New Hanover
  • Wrightsville Beach, New Hanover County
  • New Hanover
  • Lumberton, Robeson County
  • Robeson
  • Goldsboro, Wayne County
  • Wayne
Building Types:
  • Commercial;
  • Educational;
  • Fraternal;
  • Industrial;
  • Religious;
  • Residential;
  • Transportation
Styles & Forms:
  • Colonial Revival;
  • Romanesque Revival

Goldsboro Union Station [Goldsboro]

View larger image and credits

Goldsboro Union Station [Goldsboro]

Biography

Joseph F. Leitner (June 13, 1871-June 2, 1930) was a mobile and prolific architect who began his career in Georgia, then worked in South and North Carolina, returned to Georgia, and ended his days in Florida. During a highly productive decade in Wilmington, North Carolina, first with his partner William J. Wilkins and then alone Leitner designed many substantial commercial buildings, residences, schools, industrial buildings, and railroad structures. Especially well known as a railroad architect, he served from 1909 through 1912 as official architect of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, for which he designed buildings in Wilmington, Rocky Mount, Fayetteville, and elsewhere.

A son of Major Henry Daniel Leitner and Annie E. Jackson of Augusta, Georgia, Leitner received his education at the Emory College School of Technology (now Georgia Tech). He began practicing architecture in 1893 with Albert Wheeler Todd, an established architect in Augusta, as Todd and Leitner. He soon formed his own practice, and from 1894 through 1900 he designed several buildings in Augusta and in South Carolina. In 1895 Leitner married Marie (Birdie) Zachary of Augusta.

In 1901, Leitner left Augusta for Columbia, South Carolina, where he worked in the office of architect Charles C. Wilson, a leading figure in the state's architectural practice. As draftsman and later traveling representative for the prestigious firm, the young architect gained extensive knowledge and experience. After five years with Wilson, in 1906 Leitner formed a partnership with Florence, South Carolina contractor-architect William J. Wilkins. The two men developed a region-wide practice that extended into Georgia, Alabama, the Carolinas, Florida, and Tennessee. In 1906 they established an office in Wilmington, North Carolina, in the Southern Building. During 1906-1908 the firm designed buildings of diverse types in the port city, including commercial, religious, and residential structures. The partners also planned a number of railroad stations, including the 1907 Atlantic Coast Line station in Florence, South Carolina, an important commission for both men, and the large and handsome Goldsboro Union Station in Goldsboro, North Carolina, also in 1907. (Wilkins had previously designed a small depot in Chadbourn, North Carolina, in 1904.) These projects strengthened their expertise and reputation in designing railroad buildings.

Late in 1908 Leitner again established his own firm, staying in Wilmington while Wilkins continued on his own and with other partners until 1932, chiefly in South Carolina. In 1909, probably on the strength of the recent railroad structures, Leitner won an important appointment as official architect for the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, a position he held through 1912. In this capacity, as the Wilmington Star reported on August 14, 1909, he had responsibility for planning all of the company's facilities that cost $10,000 or more. His buildings appeared in Florida, the Carolinas, and elsewhere along the ACL's north-south line. One of his best known buildings is the Union Station in Tampa, Florida. Like many of his contemporaries, Leitner worked in most popular styles of the day, including the Colonial Revival and various combinations of Romanesque, Flemish, and Italianate modes. Many of his buildings are of red brick with bold, contrasting classical details and curved "Flemish" gables.

In North Carolina, Leitner's projects for the ACL included some of the most imposing railroad buildings in the eastern part of the state. In Rocky Mount, he designed the expansion of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Passenger Depot as well as the Ricks Hotel and the ACL's Atlantic Coast Line Railroad YMCA, both large brick buildings near the depot. For the Atlantic Coast Line Railway Station in Fayetteville he employed an eclectic style with shaped gables and classical detailing similar to the earlier depot in Goldsboro. His largest undertaking in North Carolina was the immense complex of the Atlantic Coast Line in Wilmington, where the firm had its headquarters. This included the towering Union Station to serve the ACL and other lines and a large Atlantic Coast Line Office Building. The Wilmington Star of January 6, 1912, announced that the station and office building were expected to cost $300,000. Within a short time Leitner also planned a "mammoth cold storage plant" near the tracks. Farther afield, he designed the Winston-Salem Southbound Freight Depot for a recently established ACL affiliate line in Winston-Salem.

Doubtless because of his association with the ACL, Leitner gained the commission for one of Wilmington's most prominent residences, the Colonial Revival style Thomas M. Emerson House (Emerson-Kenan House), built for the president of the company. The Wilmington Dispatch reported on August 6, 1910, "Mr. J.F. Leitner, the well known architect of Wilmington, has prepared plans for a very handsome residence which President T.M. Emerson, of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, contemplates erecting at Carolina Heights." The drawings indicated that it would be a "pleasing brick residence" with "quite a large number of rooms," and "one of the finest residences in Wilmington." Leitner found favor with Wilmington leaders, for a series of substantial local projects ensued: the expansion of Tileston School, the Wiggins Building and the Wilmington Savings and Trust Building, all in 1910; the Atlantic Trust and Banking Building in 1911; the large and luxurious Hinton House, in a prime block of Market Street, in 1913; and the William Hooper School in 1914. He also served as the supervising architect of the prestigious Cape Fear Club in 1912, and in July of that year the club was exhibiting Leitner's sketches of the building.

Leitner's practice beyond Wilmington included such public and private projects as the Columbus County Courthouse (1914-1915) in Whiteville and a handsome Southern Colonial style residence, the R. E. L. Brown House, in nearby Chadbourn. In 1914 he designed the $80,000 Lumberton Hotel near the Robeson County Courthouse. He gained commissions for several schools, including three proposed in Fayetteville in 1911 and others later on in Charlotte. While in North Carolina, Leitner was active in the state's architectural profession, serving twice as president of the North Carolina Architectural Association and as a member of the North Carolina Board of Architecture.

After a little more than a decade in Wilmington, Leitner continued his pattern of mobility. He opened an office in Atlanta in 1917 with architect C. P. Niederhauser, formerly active in Jacksonville, Florida. He moved to Atlanta and by 1919 joined the Atlanta firm of Edwards and Sayward (William Augustus Edwards and William J. Sayward), who had a lucrative regional practice. Evidently his architectural career in Atlanta did not prosper. In 1920 he was listed as secretary-treasurer of the Perfect Packing Company. He may be the architect by that name cited as being in Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1921. Drawn southward again, he was probably the architect named Leitner active in St. Petersburg, Florida, in the firms of Leitner and Henson (1926) and Brown and Leitner (1927). By 1930, Joseph F. Leitner and his wife, Birdie, were living in Tampa, Florida, where he identified himself as an architect specializing in bridges. He died June 2, 1930, and was buried in Harlem Memorial Cemetery in Harlem, Georgia, as was his wife, Birdie, who passed away in 1968.

Authors: Edward F. Turberg, John E. Wells, and Catherine W. Bishir.

Published 2011

Building List

Columbus County Courthouse (Whiteville, Columbus County)

Columbus Whiteville

1914

Contributors:
Dates: 1914-1915
Location: Whiteville, Columbus County
Street Address: Corner Madison St. and Jefferson St., Whiteville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Eastern North Carolina (1996).
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record, Aug. 20, 1914, noted Leitner as architect for the courthouse. The brick edifice with broad Doric portico is the centerpiece of Whiteville. Commissioned originally to design a fireproof building, Leitner produced a plan for a domed building with an estimated cost of $100,000. Amendments to reduce the cost to $50,000 eliminated the dome and limited the fireproof construction to the vaults.

Columbus County Courthouse

Tileston School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1872

Contributors:
Dates: 1872; 1910 [expanded]; 1937 [expanded]
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 400 Ann St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984).
Note:

This is the "enlarge high school" project noted for Leitner in the Manufacturers' Record of June 30, 1910. It was an addition to the original building of 1871-1872. Boney planned the third addition to Tileston School, the Ann Street wings; it was estimated to cost $26,000.

Seashore Hotel (Wrightsville Beach, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wrightsville Beach

1897

Contributors:
Dates: 1897
Location: Wrightsville Beach, New Hanover County
Street Address: Station Three, 275 S. Lumina Ave., Wrightsville Beach, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Susan Taylor Block, Cape Fear Lost (1999).
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record, Feb. 3, 1909, noted that Leitner was architect for an addition to the Seashore Hotel at Wrightsville Beach. The ocean front hotel, as noted by Susan Block, opened in 1898 and was expanded over the years. Renamed the Ocean Terrace Hotel in 1935, it suffered damage from Hurricane Hazel in 1954 and a year later was destroyed by fire. Its site is now occupied by the Blockade Runner hotel.

Masonic Temple (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1898

Contributors:
Dates: 1898-1899; 1914 [remodeled]
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 25 N. Front St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Fraternal
Images Published In:
  • Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984).
Note:

Wilmington architect-builder James F. Post submitted a design for the Masonic Temple, but the Masons chose the design by the Minnesota architect McMillen, who specialized in Masonic temples. This commission brought McMillen to Wilmington, where he settled down to practice his profession. The cornerstone was laid on May 18, 1899, and the building opened on November 20. The 4-story edifice of pressed brick and brownstone had stores on the first floor, offices on the second floor, the Masonic lodge halls on the third floor, and a ballroom on the fourth floor. In January, 1914, the Scottish Rite Masons leased the ballroom from the central body and expended $4000 to create a theater, complete with stage, designed by J. F. Leitner. See Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984) for more details.

Masonic Temple

Columbus County Jail (Whiteville, Columbus County)

Columbus Whiteville

1909

Contributors:
Dates: 1909
Location: Whiteville, Columbus County
Street Address: Whiteville, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Public
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record of July 22 and August 12, 1909, noted that Leitner designed the jail.

R. E. L. Brown House (Chadbourn, Columbus County)

Columbus Chadbourn

1909

Variant Name(s):
  • Robert E. Lee Brown House
Contributors:
Dates: 1909
Location: Chadbourn, Columbus County
Street Address: 108 N. Howard St., Chadbourn, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record of Nov. 11, and Nov. 18, noted that Leitner had designed a "colonial residence" for Brown. It is the most prominent of several Colonial Revival houses in town.

Atlantic Coast Line Railway Station (Fayetteville, Cumberland County)

Cumberland Fayetteville

1910

Contributors:
Dates: 1910-1911
Location: Fayetteville, Cumberland County
Street Address: Corner of Hay St. and Hillsboro St., Fayetteville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Transportation
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record, Dec. 15, 1910, noted Leitner as architect of the station. Like Leitner's Goldsboro station, it features curvilinear gables and eclectic details.

Atlantic Coast Line Railway Station

Fayetteville Schools (Fayetteville, Cumberland County)

Cumberland Fayetteville

1911

Contributors:
Dates: 1911
Location: Fayetteville, Cumberland County
Street Address: Fayetteville, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The Wilmington Star reported on April 30, 1911, that Leitner had provided designs for three new schools in Fayetteville. They have not been further identified.

Winston-Salem Southbound Freight Depot (Winston-Salem, Forsyth County)

Forsyth Winston-Salem

1913

Contributors:
Dates: 1913
Location: Winston-Salem, Forsyth County
Street Address: 304-308 S. Liberty St., Winston-Salem, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Transportation
Note:

Located in Salem, the office and freight terminal was built for the Winston-Salem Southbound, which was associated with the ACL. It has been renovated as offices.

Winston-Salem Southbound Freight Depot

First Ward School (Charlotte, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Charlotte

1918

Contributors:
Dates: 1918
Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: Charlotte, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational

High School (Charlotte, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Charlotte

1919

Contributors:
Dates: 1919
Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: Morehead St., Charlotte, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The Wilmington Dispatch noted on March 23, 1917 that Leitner, formerly of Wilmington, had provided plans for two high schools in Charlotte, North Carolina, to cost $150,000 each and a third to cost only $18,000. On Feb. 24, 1919, the Wilmington Star reported that a redesign had reduced the cost of one of the high schools to $135,000. This is probably the former Charlotte High School, which became the Central High School in 1920.

Third Ward Grammar School (Charlotte, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Charlotte

1918

Contributors:
Dates: 1918
Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: Charlotte, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Educational

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Passenger Depot (Rocky Mount, Nash County)

Nash Rocky Mount

1907

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1907; 1911
Location: Rocky Mount, Nash County
Street Address: S. Main St., Rocky Mount, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Transportation
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record of Jan. 12, 1911, reported that Leitner was architect for the remodeling of the ACL depot and office building in Rocky Mount. The depot, one of the most important on the route through North Carolina, developed over several stages. The initial building, credited to Charles E. Hartge in 1891, is shown on Sanborn Maps of 1893 and 1901 as a 1-story, frame building. This structure was either razed or possibly incorporated into the next building. By 1907, the brick station consisted of a 2-story center section and a 1-story wing; the architect of this stage has not been identified. By 1912, thanks to Leitner's remodeling, the much enlarged 2-story brick building had two 2-story wings, each of which extended to the rear. Further expansions brought the building to its present 3-story form. The postcard image shows the 2-story building created in 1911.

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Passenger Depot

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad YMCA (Rocky Mount, Nash County)

Nash Rocky Mount

1910

Contributors:
Dates: 1910
Location: Rocky Mount, Nash County
Street Address: Florida St., Rocky Mount, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Recreational
Note:

Manufacturers' Record, Nov. 11, 1909 and Dec. 15, 1910 cites the YMCA as Leitner's design. It appears on the 1912 Sanborn Insurance Map of Rocky Mount as a large brick structure.

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad YMCA

Ricks Hotel (Rocky Mount, Nash County)

Nash Rocky Mount

1908

Contributors:
Dates: 1908
Location: Rocky Mount, Nash County
Street Address: Hammond St., Rocky Mount, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record of Aug. 6, 1908, noted Leitner as architect for a hotel in Rocky Mount for T. L. Bland and R.H. Ricks. By 1912, the Sanborn Insurance Map of Rocky Mount depicted the large brick hotel on Hammond St. The postcard shows the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Passenger Depot after the third story was added, and the Ricks Hotel is on the right.

Ricks Hotel

Atlantic Coast Line Office Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1912

Contributors:
Dates: 1912
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Front St. and Red Cross Sts., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Transportation
Images Published In:
  • Susan Taylor Block, Cape Fear Lost (1999).

Atlantic Trust and Banking Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1911

Contributors:
Dates: 1911
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 2-4 N. Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Eastern North Carolina (1996).
Note:

The 9--story building was Wilmington's first skyscraper and remains a landmark in the city skyline.

Atlantic Trust and Banking Building

Cape Fear Club (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1912

Contributors:
Dates: 1912
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 124 N. 2nd St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Fraternal
Images Published In:
  • Beverly Tetterton, Wilmington: Lost But Not Forgotten (2005).
Note:

The white-columned, red brick edifice, "patterned closely after the Colonial style of architecture" was designed by New York architect C. H. P. Gilbert with Kenneth Murchison, a North Carolina-born New York architect as consulting architect. The men's club was founded in 1852 and reorganized in 1866 by former Confederate officers and others, and is still active

Cold Storage Plant (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1912

Contributors:
Dates: 1912
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 2nd St. at Campbell St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Industrial
Note:

The Wilmington Star of July 17, 1912, reported that Leitner was architect for a "mammoth cold storage plant" at the corner of 2nd and Campbell streets, and that the contractor was Boyles-Robertson of Washington, D. C., a firm that was currently constructing the Union Station.

Corbett House (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1909

Variant Name(s):
  • M. J. Corbett House
Contributors:
Dates: 1909
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Wilmington, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Residential

Elks Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1902

Contributors:
Dates: 1902, 1911
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 255-259 N. Front St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Fraternal
Note:

According to Tony P. Wrenn in Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984), the building was erected in 1902 and remodeled inside in 1906 by Leitner and Wilkins, and the fa├žade was redesigned by Leitner in 1911. (The Manufacturers' Record of June 22, 1911, noted the "remodeling and addition" by Leitner and Wilkins.) The organizational meeting of the North Carolina Association of Architects, in which Leitner was a leader, was held here in July, 1906.

Emerson-Kenan House (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1909

Variant Name(s):
  • Thomas M. Emerson House
Contributors:
  • Carrere and Hastings, architects;
  • Thomas Hastings, architect;
  • Joseph F. Leitner, architect;
  • Leonard Schulze, architect
Dates: 1909-1911; 1923; 1931
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 1705 Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984).
Note:

The August 6, 1910 Wilmington Dispatch reported, "Mr. J.F. Leitner, the well known architect of Wilmington, has prepared plans for a very handsome residence which President T.M. Emerson, of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, contemplates erecting at Carolina Heights. Drawings of the proposed residence have been finished. These give illustrations of what will be one of the finest residences in Wilmington. The drawings reveal a pleasing brick residence several stories in height, with quite a large number of rooms. The structure will be of commanding appearance and will be a great addition to the section of the city in which it is to be erected. It is stated that work will be started on the house in the fall and that several months will be required for its completion." The house was renovated in 1923 for heiress and philanthropist Sarah Graham Kenan from designs by architect Thomas Carrere of Carrere and Hastings of New York. After a fire in 1931, architect Leonard Schulze designed the interior rebuilding. Some accounts (see Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait [1984]), indicate that the house was begun during the ownership of Mary Bridgers from designs by Burrett Stephens and was essentially complete in 1908 before Emerson purchased it. But when Mary Bridgers sold the property to May B. Emerson, Thomas Emerson, the deed, dated Jan. 27, 1909, stated: "No dwelling house shall be erected on the premises to cost less than $4,500."

First Church of Christ, Scientist (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1907

Contributors:
Dates: 1907
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 17th St. and Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Susan Taylor Block, Cape Fear Lost (1999).
  • Beverly Tetterton, Wilmington: Lost But Not Forgotten (2005).
Note:

The Wilmington Star, April 27, 1907, described it as a "Colonial style" church seating 200. Mary Bridgers, developer of the Carolina Heights suburb, was a Christian Scientist. The small temple-form building was sold to a Baptist congregation in the 1920s and burned in 1952.

Foster and Davis Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1911

Contributors:
Dates: 1911
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Wilmington, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

Manufacturers' Record, Dec. 29, 1910.

Frank T. Mills Stables (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1906

Contributors:
Dates: 1906
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Wilmington, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Transportation

Hall and Pearsall Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1907

Contributors:
Dates: 1907
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 711 Nutt St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Beverly Tetterton, Wilmington: Lost But Not Forgotten (2005).

Harper Drugstore (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1907

Variant Name(s):
  • Dr. Charles T. Harper Drugstore
Contributors:
Dates: 1907
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: NW corner of Front St. and Castle St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Beverly Tetterton, Wilmington: Lost But Not Forgotten (2005).
Note:

The Wilmington Star of July 9, 1907, reported that the new building was to hold the drugstore of Dr. Charles T. Harper. This may have been a remodeling of an existing building.

Hinton House (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1912

Variant Name(s):
  • Joseph Hinton House
Contributors:
Dates: 1912-1913
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 1919 Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

The expansive brick house features dramatic curvilinear gables and a deep porch. Joseph Hinton was a businessman who owned the Orton Hotel and other facilities. The Wilmington Dispatch of Sept. 15, 1911, described it admiringly and noted that it was "after the Elizabethan style of architecture," which was seldom seen in the area.

Isaac Bear School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1912

Contributors:
Dates: 1912
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Market St. between 12th St. and 13th St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Beverly Tetterton, Wilmington: Lost But Not Forgotten (2005).
Note:

Wilmington Star, March 3, 1912.

James T. Woolvin Store Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1906

Contributors:
Dates: 1906
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Wilmington, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

Manufacturers' Record, June 28 and July 26, 1906.

Murchison National Bank Business Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1915

Contributors:
Dates: 1915
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Wilmington, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record of June 17, 1915, mentioned Leitner in connection with the Murchison National Bank Business Building, but it is not clear what building was referred to.

Peterson and Rulfs Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1906

Contributors:
Dates: 1906-1907
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 210-212 N. Front St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

Cited in the Manufacturers' Record of March 22 and June 7, 1906, the Commercial building was one of Leitner and Wilkins's first projects in Wilmington.

St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Sunday School Addition (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1909

Contributors:
Dates: 1909
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 520 N. 5th St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

Manufacturers' Record, Dec. 30, 1909, and Dec. 25, 1910.

Union Station (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1912

Variant Name(s):
  • Wilmington Union Station
Contributors:
Dates: 1912
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Front St. and Red Cross Sts., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Transportation
Images Published In:
  • Susan Taylor Block, Cape Fear Lost (1999).
  • Beverly Tetterton, Wilmington: Lost But Not Forgotten (2005).
Note:

The 6-story edifice served as union station for the lines that made Wilmington a railroad hub, including the ACL. The Wilmington Star reported on Jan. 6, 1912, that Leitner was architect for the ACL union station and office building, which were anticipated to cost $300,000. On Feb. 5, 1913, the Star noted, "Mr. Joseph F. Leitner, the architect, was present to explain the location of an ornamental shed at the new union station, suspended over the streets, for the protection of pedestrians and passengers. No objection to its location was presented by Council, after the plans and drawings were inspected." It was one of several massive railroad buildings in Wilmington, nearly all of which were destroyed after the ACL moved its headquarters to Florida in 1960. See Beverly Tetterton, Wilmington: Lost But Not Forgotten (2005), for a photograph of its implosion in 1970.

Union Station

Wiggins Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1910

Contributors:
Dates: 1910
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 21 Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

Wilmington Star, Dec. 12, 1912.

William Hooper School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1914

Contributors:
Dates: 1914
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 410 Meares St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Williams Apartment House (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1915

Contributors:
Dates: 1915
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 212 Red Cross St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record of Oct. 28, 1915, cited Leitner as architect for an apartment house built for Miss Valeria Williams and R. V. Williams. The Wilmington Star of Oct. 23, 1915, reported Leitner as architect and said that it would have 23 rooms.

Wilmington Savings and Trust Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1910

Variant Name(s):
  • Wilmington Savings and Loan Building
Contributors:
Dates: 1910-1911
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 110 Princess St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record of Sept. 8, 1910, noted that Leitner had the commission to design the "Wilmington Savings and Loan Building."

Goldsboro Union Station (Goldsboro, Wayne County)

Wayne Goldsboro

1907

Contributors:
Dates: 1907-1909
Location: Goldsboro, Wayne County
Street Address: Carolina St. at end of Walnut St., Goldsboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Transportation
Note:

The imposing union station, which served the ACL, Southern, and Norfolk and Southern lines, is a boldly detailed brick building with curvilinear gables on three sides. It was designed by Leitner and Wilkins shortly before the two architects parted and Leitner became official architect for the ACL.

Goldsboro Union Station

Lumberton Hotel (Lumberton, Robeson County)

Robeson Lumberton

1914

Contributors:
Dates: 1914
Location: Lumberton, Robeson County
Street Address: Chestnut St. at Courthouse Square, Lumberton, NC
Status: Unbuilt
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The News and Observer of Raleigh reported on May 25, 1914, that Leitner was architect for the "new Lumberton Hotel" to cost $80,000. Because of financial problems related to World War I in Europe, the Lumberton Hotel Company was unable to construct the proposed 60-room hotel. In 1916 the company contracted for a smaller hotel to have 48 rooms (see Frank B. Simpson's Lorraine Hotel [The Robesonian, June 22, 1914, Jan. 10, 1916, Aug. 31, 1916]).

Joseph F. Leitner's Work Locations

Bibliography

  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Eastern North Carolina (1996).
  • Susan Taylor Block, Cape Fear Lost (1999).
  • Charlotte Vestal Brown Papers, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, North Carolina.
  • Manufacturers' Record, various issues.
  • Michelle Ann Michael, "The Rise of the Regional Architect in North Carolina as Seen Through the Manufacturers' Record, 1890-1910," M. H. P. Thesis, University of Georgia (1994).
  • William Reaves Files, New Hanover County Public Library, Wilmington, North Carolina.
  • Beverly Tetterton, Wilmington: Lost But Not Forgotten (2005).
  • United States Census, 1900-1930.
  • John E. Wells and Robert E. Dalton, The South Carolina Architects, 1885-1935: A Biographical Dictionary (1992).
  • Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984).
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