North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

Coming Soon

NC Architects and Builders is a growing system. We will post this entry as soon as it is ready.

Bain, William Carter (1839-1920)

Variant Name(s):
  • W. C. Bain
Birthplace: Guilford County, North Carolina, USA
Residences:
  • Durham, North Carolina
  • Greensboro, North Carolina
Trades:
  • Contractor
NC Work Locations:
  • Burlington, Alamance County
  • Alamance
  • Graham, Alamance County
  • Alamance
  • Asheville, Buncombe County
  • Buncombe
  • Fayetteville, Cumberland County
  • Cumberland
  • Durham, Durham County
  • Durham
  • Winston-Salem, Forsyth County
  • Forsyth
  • Oxford, Granville County
  • Granville
  • Greensboro, Guilford County
  • Guilford
  • High Point, Guilford County
  • Guilford
  • Pinehurst, Moore County
  • Moore
  • Wilmington, New Hanover County
  • New Hanover
  • Greenville, Pitt County
  • Pitt
  • Reidsville, Rockingham County
  • Rockingham
  • Raleigh, Wake County
  • Wake
  • Wake Forest, Wake County
  • Wake
Building Types:
  • Commercial;
  • Industrial;
  • Religious;
  • Residential
Styles & Forms:
  • Colonial Revival;
  • Gothic Revival;
  • Italianate;
  • Queen Anne;
  • Romanesque Revival

Oneida Cotton Mill [Graham]

View larger image and credits

Oneida Cotton Mill [Graham]

Biography

William Carter Bain (January 8, 1839- July 8, 1920) was a prolific and adaptable contractor who epitomized the energetic entrepreneurship of the post-Civil War well into the 20th century. Bain began as a small-town artisan, served in the Confederate army, and became a regional builder and manufacturer. Adapting successfully to changing times during a long working life, he operated a large construction firm in Greensboro that erected many notable buildings throughout Piedmont North Carolina. Because many of his buildings have been lost, and because his work ranged across many towns, counties, and periods, his contribution to the building up of the state has often been overlooked.

Bain was born in the Liberty community of Guilford County, the son of Jonathan Bain (Bane), a cooper, and Lydia Carter Bain. After his father died in the 1850s, young William moved with his mother, brother, and sister to adjoining Randolph County. In 1858 he went to work as a "mechanic" for his brother J. C. Bain in his wagon and carriage making factory. In 1862, after marrying Mary A. Lane of Randolph County, William Bain joined the Confederate army (Company G, 46th N.C. Regiment, Cook's Brigade), and served until the war's end. Like many veterans, he made his way in a changed world. He returned home in 1865, rejoined his brother as a wagon-maker, and began a family. After six to ten years (accounts vary), he "went into the building business in a small way." He left his home territory for a period, for reasons unknown. In 1880 he was listed as a merchant in or near Selma in Johnston County, where he and his family lived near John A. Waddell of the construction company Wilson and Waddell, suggesting a possible association.

During the 1880s, Bain returned to the central Piedmont, where he expanded his operations and formed productive relationships throughout the industrializing region. Like others of the day, he combined contracting with the manufacture of building materials. In 1889 Bain joined with Moses Hammond, L. J. Steed, and others to organize the Hammond Manufacturing Company, a "general wood-working business" located in Archdale, Randolph County, a few miles west of Bain's family home in Liberty. That firm had begun in 1866 as W. Petty & Company, manufacturing building materials and contracting; however, after founder Petty's death, his brother-in-law Moses Hammond reorganized the company. The Moses Hammond House in Archdale presents a full sampling of the firm's output (see Whatley, Randolph County).

After living and working briefly in the tobacco boom town of Durham, by 1890 Bain settled in Greensboro, where he operated the Cape Fear Manufacturing Company (formerly the Greensboro Sash, Door, and Blind Factory). A Greensboro Chamber of Commerce notice ca. 1893 described Bain's firm as having "operations that are very large... extend beyond the borders of the state, and have won enviable reputation for their integrity and excellent character in their output." In 1895 Bain merged his business with the Central Carolina Construction Company, which became one of the largest building firms in the Piedmont.

According to a contemporary, Bain was "the builder of some of the principal public and private edifices in the South." His projects from the 1880s through the early 1900s encompassed a range of building types from banks and civic buildings to resort hotels and residences. He worked in a full spectrum of popular styles, including the Italianate, Romanesque, Queen Anne, and early Colonial Revival modes. Like many contractors, Bain sometimes executed architects' designs, and sometimes used published designs or his own ideas. Progressive Greensboro of 1903 emphasized that he "undertakes the construction of buildings of any description from architects' plans, and is prepared to submit estimates at short notice, and to faithfully and efficiently carry out all contracts." He evidently struck up a relationship with Raleigh architect Charles W. Barrett and constructed two Colonial Revival houses that Barrett published in his Colonial Southern Homes (1903). Later he was contractor for a Greensboro church addition by Charlotte architects Hook and Sawyer, and advertised his services in that firm's promotional publication.

Bain's clients included leading industrialists of the day. For L. Banks Holt of the Alamance County textile dynasty, he expanded the Oneida Cotton Mill in Graham and was described as the architect as well as builder of the L. Banks Holt House, a "palatial estate" with a "mansion" lavishly adorned with brackets and millwork. In nearby Burlington, Bain expanded another Holt mill and built the grand James H. Holt House in the Queen Anne style. He probably built other Italianate and Queen Anne style Holt family residences as well. Bain was cited as a builder of tobacco magnate Julian S. Carr's mansion in Durham, a spectacular $125,000 Queen Anne style residence called Somerset Villa (1887-1888), designed by New York architect John B. Halcott, though Bain's role among the many contractors and suppliers is uncertain.

Bain took a strong role in developing Greensboro in the 1890s and early 1900s, and he became known for undertaking the "big jobs." Because of the rebuilding of the city in subsequent years, much of his work has been destroyed and often forgotten. He built the City Hall [City Hall and Opera House] and the Carnegie Library (both of which, now lost, featured arched openings, bold brickwork, and free classical detailing). Among the city's surviving buildings, he produced the woodwork for the magnificent West Market Street Methodist Church (1893-1894), and built the stone-faced, 6-story "skyscraper" known as the 1904 Dixie Building.

Contemporary accounts indicate that Bain built "a large number of residences," but his residential work remains largely unidentified. A few examples may indicate the character of others. In Oxford, the Thomas White, Jr. House (1889) displays a lavish Eastlake-Queen Anne style, a house for which the $3,819 contract with Bain specified every item. His own William C. Bain House (ca. 1889) in Greensboro features a simpler Queen Anne style with turned and geometric millwork. In Reidsville, Bain was identified as "the popular contractor from Greensboro" when he was "looking after the conclusion of the work" on the eclectic Main Street Methodist Church in 1893. Reidsville has several ornate Italianate houses that show a kinship in form and detail with some in Greensboro and Alamance County, possibly indicating Bain's role as contractor or supplier, but no documentation has come to light.

A major opportunity for Bain came with development of the resort community of Pinehurst, laid out by Frederick Law Olmsted in 1895 in the Sandhills. There Bain took the contract for the Carolina Hotel (1899-1900), a grand $100,000 Colonial Revival style building designed by noted Boston architects Kendall, Taylor and Stevens. He also constructed the Harvard Hotel (lost) and probably other buildings in the resort community.

Bain flourished in his business into the early 20th century and continued to take on big projects. He was contractor in 1904-1907 for two college edifices, the Agriculture Building [Patterson Hall] at present North Carolina State University in Raleigh and Spencer Hall at present University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Probably typical of his arrangements for such jobs was the April 15, 1904 contract between W. C. Bain, contractor, and the State Normal and Industrial College of Greensboro, for the "New Dormitory," which was contracted at $63,975.30 and to be completed by September 15, 1904. (The contract survives at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.) Bain agreed to "make, erect, build and finish" the structure and to "furnish all materials and labor of every description, also all cartage, tools, scaffolding, etc, etc., for the full completion of the work, in strict accordance with the drawings and the specifications prepared by Hook and Sawyer, Architects, Charlotte, which said drawings and specifications are, and are to be taken and deemed to be a part of this contract by both parties hereto, and where the quality of the workmanship and material is not otherwise specified or shown, the best is specifically implied throughout." (The contract excluded the heating and plumbing systems.) Payments were to be staged upon satisfactory completion of phases of the work.

In 1906, at an age to retire, Bain had "recently become interested in the manufacture of concrete and artificial stone with good prospects of business in that line" and was president of the Greensboro Fiber Plaster Company, which produced that increasingly popular type of material. The William B. Vaught House, ca. 1906, illustrated in Brown, Greensboro, displays an early use of artificial stone, possibly Bain's.

In 1917, the 78-year-old Bain was described not only as reliable and experienced but as "a man of advanced ideas" who "keeps fully abreast of the times and is quick to take on all the new ideas and embrace them in his work... Call him up over 'phone No. 119." He was a director and stockholder in the City National Bank and the North State Fire Insurance Company in Greensboro and a trustee of Grace Methodist Church in Greensboro. Late in life he had a model farm on the outskirts of Greensboro. His son Edward also went into the local lumber and building materials business.

William Carter Bain's stature in his day was affirmed by sketches of his career in Greensboro publications and Samuel Ashe's Biographical History of North Carolina. Yet despite his prominence and the large output of his firm, Bain seldom gained mention in local histories. Many of his principal works--the civic buildings of Greensboro, the showplace residences of industrial leaders--have been lost along with others of their era, supplanted by subsequent generations in fast-growing towns. It is likely, however, that many more buildings may be identified as his work.

Author: Catherine W. Bishir. Contributor: Adam Ronan.

Published 2009

Building List

Dixie Building (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1904

Variant Name(s):
  • City National Bank
Contributors:
Dates: 1904
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 125 S. Elm St., Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).

Dixie Building

Wachovia Bank and Trust Company Building (Winston-Salem, Forsyth County)

Forsyth Winston-Salem

1911

Variant Name(s):
  • Wachovia National Bank Building
Contributors:
Dates: 1911; 1917-1918 [addition and renovation]
Location: Winston-Salem, Forsyth County
Street Address: 8 West 3rd St., Winston-Salem, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Piedmont North Carolina (2003).
  • Edwin E. Bouldin, Jr., Architectural Guide to Winston-Salem and Forsyth County (1978).
  • Molly Grogan Rawls, Winston-Salem in Vintage Postcards (2004).
Note:

Wachovia, a banking company that originated in Winston-Salem, began the city's early 20th century "race to the sky" with Milburn and Heister's 7-story steel-framed skyscraper. After the O'Hanlon Building (see Northup and O'Brien) was built to 8 stories in 1914, Wachovia had Milburn and Heister add another story to their edifice. Both were soon eclipsed by taller buildings.

Wachovia Bank and Trust Company Building

Pitt County Courthouse (Greenville, Pitt County)

Pitt Greenville

1910

Contributors:
Dates: 1910-1911
Location: Greenville, Pitt County
Street Address: Greenville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, North Carolina Architecture (1990).
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Eastern North Carolina (1996).
  • Scott Power, The Historical Architecture of Pitt County, North Carolina (1991).

Pitt County Courthouse

R.B. Raney House (Raleigh, Wake County)

Wake Raleigh

1902

Contributors:
Dates: 1902
Location: Raleigh, Wake County
Street Address: 102 Hillsborough St., Raleigh, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Charles W. Barrett, Colonial Southern Homes (1903).
  • Catherine W. Bishir, "Landmarks of Power: Building a Southern Past, 1855-1915," reprinted in Catherine W. Bishir, Southern Built: American Architecture, Regional Practice (2006).

W.C. Powell House (Wake Forest, Wake County)

Wake Wake Forest

1900

Contributors:
Dates: 1900-1903
Location: Wake Forest, Wake County
Street Address: 564 N. Main St., Wake Forest, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Charles W. Barrett, Colonial Southern Homes (1903).
  • Kelly A. Lally, The Historic Architecture of Wake County, North Carolina (1994).

Elmira Cotton Mill (Burlington, Alamance County)

Alamance Burlington

1886

Contributors:
Dates: 1886-1887; 1889 [addition]
Location: Burlington, Alamance County
Street Address: W. Webb Ave., Burlington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Industrial
Images Published In:
  • Allison Harris Black, An Architectural History of Burlington, North Carolina (1987).
Note:

In 1889, a third story was added to the mill.

James H. Holt House (Burlington, Alamance County)

Alamance Burlington

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900
Location: Burlington, Alamance County
Street Address: 400 W. Davis St., Burlington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Allison Harris Black, An Architectural History of Burlington, North Carolina (1987).

Oneida Cotton Mill (Graham, Alamance County)

Alamance Graham

1882

Contributors:
Dates: 1882; 1887
Location: Graham, Alamance County
Street Address: 219 W. Harden St., Graham, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Industrial

Oneida Cotton Mill

L. Banks Holt House (Graham, Alamance County)

Alamance Graham

1890

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1890
Location: Graham, Alamance County
Street Address: Graham, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Residential

L. Banks Holt House

Asheville Telephone and Telegraph Co. Building (Asheville, Buncombe County)

Buncombe Asheville

1905

Variant Name(s):
  • Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Building
Contributors:
Dates: 1905-1906
Location: Asheville, Buncombe County
Street Address: 41 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial

Holt-Morgan Cotton Mill (Fayetteville, Cumberland County)

Cumberland Fayetteville

1898

Contributors:
Dates: 1898
Location: Fayetteville, Cumberland County
Street Address: NE corner of Southern Ave. and Whitfield St., Fayetteville, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Industrial
Images Published In:
  • Duncan Rose, The Resources and Industries of Cumberland County and Fayetteville, North Carolina (1897).

Kyle Building (Fayetteville, Cumberland County)

Cumberland Fayetteville

1906

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1906
Location: Fayetteville, Cumberland County
Street Address: Corner of Hay St. and Market St., Fayetteville, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Commercial

Somerset Villa (Durham, Durham County)

Durham Durham

1888

Variant Name(s):
  • Julian S. Carr House
Contributors:
Dates: 1888
Location: Durham, Durham County
Street Address: Dillard St., Durham, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Claudia P. Roberts (Brown) and Diane E. Lea, The Durham Architectural and Historic Inventory (1982).

Thomas White, Jr. House (Oxford, Granville County)

Granville Oxford

1889

Contributors:
Dates: 1889
Location: Oxford, Granville County
Street Address: S. Main St., Oxford, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown and Andrew J. Carlson, Heritage and Homesteads: The History and Architecture of Granville County, North Carolina (1988).

John Henry Bullock House (Oxford, Granville County)

Granville Oxford

1891

Contributors:
Dates: 1891
Location: Oxford, Granville County
Street Address: Broad St., Oxford, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown and Andrew J. Carlson, Heritage and Homesteads: The History and Architecture of Granville County, North Carolina (1988).

William C. Bain House (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1899

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1899
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 739 Plott St. (formerly Pearson St.), Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).

City Hall and Opera House (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: Corner of Elm St. and Gaston St., Greensboro, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Patrick O'Keefe, Greensboro: A Pictorial History (1977).

City National Bank (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 119 S. Elm St., Greensboro, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial

Bain Building (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 302 1/2 S. Elm St., Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Ruth Little-Stokes, An Inventory of Historic Greensboro: Greensboro, North Carolina (1976).

M. P. Publishing House Building (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1903

Contributors:
Dates: 1903
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: Greensboro, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Commercial

First Presbyterian Church Sunday School and Auditorium (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1903

Variant Name(s):
  • Greensboro Historical Museum
Contributors:
Dates: 1903
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 220 Church St., Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).
  • Hook and Sawyer, Some Designs by Hook & Sawyer, Architects, Charlotte, N.C. (1902).
Note:

The large, Romanesque Revival building was erected as an addition to First Presbyterian Church built in 1892 and designed by L. B. Volk and Son. The pair of brick edifices now houses the local history museum. The congregation subsequently built and moved to First Presbyterian Church (1928-1929), designed by Hobart Upjohn and Harry Barton and located in the Fisher Park suburb (see entries for Hobart Upjohn and Harry Barton).

First Presbyterian Church Sunday School and Auditorium

Keeley Institute Addition to Blandwood (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1905

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1905
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 447 W. Washington St., Greensboro, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Health Care

Carnegie Library (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1906

Contributors:
Dates: 1906
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: Corner of Gaston St. and Library St., Greensboro, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Ethel Stephens Arnett, Greensboro, North Carolina: The County Seat of Guilford (1955).
  • Ruth Little-Stokes, An Inventory of Historic Greensboro: Greensboro, North Carolina (1976).

Spencer Hall (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1904

Variant Name(s):
  • New Dormitory
Contributors:
Dates: 1904;1907
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).
Note:

Spencer Hall is the principal surviving building by Hook at present University of North Carolina at Greensboro (the State Normal and Industrial College), where he also planned other buildings including an auditorium, a library, and other dormitories. When completed it was described as largest women's dormitory in the country under one roof. The Julius Isaac Foust Papers at University of North Carolina at Greenboro University Archives & Manuscripts includes correspondence with the firm of Hook and Rogers (1910s) and Thomas Sears (1920s) about construction of campus buildings and landscaping. Attached to a 1904 Hook letter is a photograph of a rendering of Spencer Hall by Hook. Spencer Hall was named for Cornelia Phillips Spencer, advocate of education for women.

Cape Fear Manufacturing Company Building (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900-1910
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 1311 S. Eugene St., Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).

Wachovia Loan and Trust Company Building (High Point, Guilford County)

Guilford High Point

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900
Location: High Point, Guilford County
Street Address: 100 N. Main St., High Point, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial

Carolina Hotel (Pinehurst, Moore County)

Moore Pinehurst

1899

Contributors:
Dates: 1899-1900
Location: Pinehurst, Moore County
Street Address: Midpines Rd., Pinehurst, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Piedmont North Carolina (2003).

Carolina Hotel

Harvard Hotel (Pinehurst, Moore County)

Moore Pinehurst

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900
Location: Pinehurst, Moore County
Street Address: Pinehurst, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial

Carolina Apartments (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1906

Contributors:
Dates: 1906-1907
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 420 Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, North Carolina Architecture (1990).
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Eastern North Carolina (1996).
  • Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984).

Main Street Methodist Church (Reidsville, Rockingham County)

Rockingham Reidsville

1890

Contributors:
Dates: 1890-1893
Location: Reidsville, Rockingham County
Street Address: 217 S. Main St., Reidsville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Piedmont North Carolina (2003).
  • Laura A. W. Phillips, Reidsville, N.C.: An Inventory of Historic and Architectural Resources (1981).

Main Street Methodist Church

Agriculture Building (Raleigh, Wake County)

Wake Raleigh

1903

Variant Name(s):
  • Patterson Hall
Contributors:
Dates: 1903-1905; 1924 [renovated]; 1930 [renovated]; 1940 [renovated]
Location: Raleigh, Wake County
Street Address: North Carolina State University Campus, Raleigh, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Marguerite E. Schumann, Strolling at State: A Walking Guide to North Carolina State University (1973).
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record (July 21, 1904) announced that S. L. Patterson, commissioner of agriculture, was to open bids on August 2nd for construction of the agriculture building for the N. C. College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. Potential bidders could view plans at the commissioner's office or "at the office of Hook and Sawyer, architects, Charlotte, Greensboro, Raleigh." This is a recent link with the architects for this prominent building at the university. Patterson Hall is said to have been modeled after the agriculture building at Ohio State University.

Agriculture Building

St. Joseph's Episcopal Church (Fayetteville, Cumberland County)

Cumberland Fayetteville

1816

Contributors:
Dates: 1816; 1896
Location: Fayetteville, Cumberland County
Street Address: 509 Ransey St., Fayetteville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

The Fayetteville Observer of March 27, 1897, announced the next day's dedication of the Episcopal church, which was described as gift to the Diocese of East Carolina in trust for the use of St. Joseph's colored congregation of this city, pf Mrs. W. F. Cochran and Fayetteville. The writer noted, "it is probable that with the exception of Mr. Vanderbilt's church at Biltmore [All Souls Episcopal Church by architect Richard Morris Hunt], there is no church interior in the State so beautiful as that of St. Joseph's." While there were costlier churches in the state, "none can exceed the tastefulness and appropriateness of every detail of the finish and fittings of this one" with its polished wood fittings and furnishings and fine stained glass. The shingled walls of the frame church enhance the picturesque character of the asymmetrical structure with its bell tower and arched openings. It is unknown whether the design came from an as yet unnamed architect or was developed by the builders. The newspaper reported, "The whole work has been under the supervision of Mr. Robert Strange, C. E., the contractor and builder being Mr. W. C. Bain, who is gaining quite a reputation here in his line; and great credit is due both of these gentlemen for the painstaking and conscientious manner in which they have performed the important duties entrusted to them." (Robert Strange was a member of a distinguished Fayetteville and Wilmington, N. C., family active in political and church life; as a civil engineer [c. e.] he had expertise in design and construction.)

St. Joseph's Episcopal Church

William Carter Bain's Work Locations

Bibliography

  • Samuel A. Ashe, et al., Biographical History of North Carolina (1907).
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Piedmont North Carolina (2003).
  • Allison Harris Black, An Architectural History of Burlington, North Carolina (1987).
  • Charlotte Vestal Brown Papers, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, North Carolina.
  • Marvin A. Brown and Andrew J. Carlson, Heritage and Homesteads: The History and Architecture of Granville County, North Carolina (1988).
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).
  • Gayle Hicks Fripp, John Harden, Dewitt Carroll, and William J. Moore, Greensboro: A Chosen Center, an Illustrated History (1982).
  • Greensboro Chamber of Commerce, Album of Greensboro N.C. (1893).
  • I. J. Isaacs, Progressive Greensboro: The Gate City of North Carolina (1903).
  • Ruth Little-Stokes, An Inventory of Historic Greensboro: Greensboro, North Carolina (1976).
  • Carl R. Lounsbury, Alamance County Architectural Heritage (1980).
  • Laura A. W. Phillips, Reidsville, N.C.: An Inventory of Historic and Architectural Resources (1981).
  • Prominent People of North Carolina: Brief Biographies of Leading People for Ready Reference Purposes (1906).
  • Lowell McKay Whatley, The Architectural History of Randolph County, North Carolina (1985).
Text Only

Brought to you by The NCSU Libraries and The NCSU Libraries Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center.

Please contact us with any additions, corrections, or updates.

Giving to the Libraries