North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Hook and Sawyer (1898-1905)

Headquarters:
  • Charlotte, North Carolina
Trades:
  • Architect
NC Work Locations:
  • Concord, Cabarrus County
  • Cabarrus
  • Fayetteville, Cumberland County
  • Cumberland
  • Lexington, Davidson County
  • Davidson
  • Mocksville, Davie County
  • Davie
  • Durham, Durham County
  • Durham
  • Gastonia, Gaston County
  • Gaston
  • Greensboro, Guilford County
  • Guilford
  • Statesville, Iredell County
  • Iredell
  • Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
  • Mecklenburg
  • Davidson, Mecklenburg County
  • Mecklenburg
  • Red Springs, Robeson County
  • Robeson
  • Eden, Rockingham County
  • Rockingham
  • Salisbury, Rowan County
  • Rowan
  • Monroe, Union County
  • Union
  • Raleigh, Wake County
  • Wake
Building Types:
  • Commercial;
  • Educational;
  • Fraternal;
  • Public;
  • Religious;
  • Residential

Biography

The firm of Hook and Sawyer was the first of three architectural partnerships formed by architect C. C. Hook. The firm, established by Hook and New Yorker Frank McMurray Sawyer, operated from 1898 to 1905 and reported 103 projects to the Manufacturers' Record. In 1902 the pair published Some Designs of Hook & Sawyer, Architects, 1892-1902. For selected works, see C. C. Hook entry.

Author: Michelle Ann Michael.

Published 2009

Building List

First Presbyterian Church Sunday School and Auditorium (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1903

Variant Name(s):
  • Greensboro Historical Museum
Contributors:
Dates: 1903
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 220 Church St., Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).
  • Hook and Sawyer, Some Designs by Hook & Sawyer, Architects, Charlotte, N.C. (1902).
Note:

The large, Romanesque Revival building was erected as an addition to First Presbyterian Church built in 1892 and designed by L. B. Volk and Son. The pair of brick edifices now houses the local history museum. The congregation subsequently built and moved to First Presbyterian Church (1928-1929), designed by Hobart Upjohn and Harry Barton and located in the Fisher Park suburb (see entries for Hobart Upjohn and Harry Barton).

First Presbyterian Church Sunday School and Auditorium

Spencer Hall (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1904

Variant Name(s):
  • New Dormitory
Contributors:
Dates: 1904;1907
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).
Note:

Spencer Hall is the principal surviving building by Hook at present University of North Carolina at Greensboro (the State Normal and Industrial College), where he also planned other buildings including an auditorium, a library, and other dormitories. When completed it was described as largest women's dormitory in the country under one roof. The Julius Isaac Foust Papers at University of North Carolina at Greenboro University Archives & Manuscripts includes correspondence with the firm of Hook and Rogers (1910s) and Thomas Sears (1920s) about construction of campus buildings and landscaping. Attached to a 1904 Hook letter is a photograph of a rendering of Spencer Hall by Hook. Spencer Hall was named for Cornelia Phillips Spencer, advocate of education for women.

Agriculture Building (Raleigh, Wake County)

Wake Raleigh

1903

Variant Name(s):
  • Patterson Hall
Contributors:
Dates: 1903-1905; 1924 [renovated]; 1930 [renovated]; 1940 [renovated]
Location: Raleigh, Wake County
Street Address: North Carolina State University Campus, Raleigh, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Marguerite E. Schumann, Strolling at State: A Walking Guide to North Carolina State University (1973).
Note:

The Manufacturers' Record (July 21, 1904) announced that S. L. Patterson, commissioner of agriculture, was to open bids on August 2nd for construction of the agriculture building for the N. C. College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. Potential bidders could view plans at the commissioner's office or "at the office of Hook and Sawyer, architects, Charlotte, Greensboro, Raleigh." This is a recent link with the architects for this prominent building at the university. Patterson Hall is said to have been modeled after the agriculture building at Ohio State University.

Agriculture Building

Pythian Building (Concord, Cabarrus County)

Cabarrus Concord

1902

Contributors:
Dates: 1902
Location: Concord, Cabarrus County
Street Address: 36-40 S. Union St., Concord, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Fraternal
Images Published In:
  • Hook and Sawyer, Some Designs by Hook & Sawyer, Architects, Charlotte, N.C. (1902).
  • Peter R. Kaplan, The Historic Architecture of Cabarrus County, North Carolina (2004).
Note:

Hook and Sawyer's drawing for the boldly composed 3-story building of rusticated stone is featured in Some Designs of Hook and Sawyer (1902). It is one of the landmarks of downtown Concord.

Pythian Building

Concord City Hall (Concord, Cabarrus County)

Cabarrus Concord

1903

Contributors:
Dates: 1903
Location: Concord, Cabarrus County
Street Address: S. Union St., Concord, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Hook and Sawyer, Some Designs by Hook & Sawyer, Architects, Charlotte, N.C. (1902).
  • Peter R. Kaplan, The Historic Architecture of Cabarrus County, North Carolina (2004).
Note:

The drawing for the Concord City Hall featured in Hook and Sawyer (1902) showed an eclectic blend of Renaissance and Italianate motifs, including a campanile-like fire tower on the right. As shown in a photograph (Kaplan, Cabarrus County), however, the building had the tower on the left.

Concord City Hall

Walter Holt House (Fayetteville, Cumberland County)

Cumberland Fayetteville

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900
Location: Fayetteville, Cumberland County
Street Address: 806 Hay St., Fayetteville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

First Presbyterian Church (Mocksville, Davie County)

Davie Mocksville

1905

Contributors:
Dates: 1905
Location: Mocksville, Davie County
Street Address: 261 S. Main St., Mocksville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Kirk Franklin Mohney, The Historic Architecture of Davie County, North Carolina: An Inventory Analysis and Documentary Catalogue (1986).
Note:

The Romanesque Revival brick building is said to incorporate the walls of the 1840 meeting house that preceded it.

Southern Conservatory of Music (Durham, Durham County)

Durham Durham

1899

Contributors:
Dates: 1899-1900
Location: Durham, Durham County
Street Address: SW corner of Main St. and Duke St., Durham, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Jean Bradley Anderson, Durham County: A History of Durham County, North Carolina (1990).
Note:

The Southern Conservatory of Music was established in 1898 and in 1900 the Duke family sponsored construction of a substantial building in memory of Mary Duke Lyon, the only daughter of Washington Duke, who died in 1893. The grand building in "Italianate" style was built to accommodate a school for music and a concert hall. The principal, Prof. Gilmore Ward Bryant, according to the Durham Sun of August 10, 1899, came to Durham in hopes of establishing such a conservatory in the South, and the project was funded by Washington Duke and his son Benjamin Duke, who were both instrumental in establishing Trinity College (later Duke University) in Durham. The conservatory opened in March 1900 (Durham Sun, March 9, 1900).

Southern Conservatory of Music

Robert Flowers House (Durham, Durham County)

Durham Durham

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900-1910
Location: Durham, Durham County
Street Address: Duke University, Durham, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Claudia P. Roberts (Brown) and Diane E. Lea, The Durham Architectural and Historic Inventory (1982).

Durham Municipal Building and Auditorium (Durham, Durham County)

Durham Durham

1902

Variant Name(s):
  • Academy of Music
Contributors:
Dates: 1902-1904
Location: Durham, Durham County
Street Address: Corcoran St., Durham, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Claudia P. Roberts (Brown) and Diane E. Lea, The Durham Architectural and Historic Inventory (1982).

Durham Municipal Building and Auditorium

Trust Building (Durham, Durham County)

Durham Durham

1904

Contributors:
Dates: 1904-1905
Location: Durham, Durham County
Street Address: 212 W. Main St., Durham, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Claudia P. Roberts (Brown) and Diane E. Lea, The Durham Architectural and Historic Inventory (1982).
Note:

According to the Manufacturers' Record (Feb. 25, 1904) Hook and Sawyer designed this commercial building for contractor Norman Underwood. When it was built, the 6-story building was one of the tallest in town. The Trust Building is pictured on the left.

Trust Building

Bivins Hall (Durham, Durham County)

Durham Durham

1905

Contributors:
Dates: 1905
Location: Durham, Durham County
Street Address: Duke University East Campus, Durham, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Claudia P. Roberts (Brown) and Diane E. Lea, The Durham Architectural and Historic Inventory (1982).

John Love Buildings (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1904

Contributors:
Dates: 1904; ca. 1906-1908
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 213-223 W. Main Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).
Note:

In 1899 and 1906 the Manufacturers' Record carried news of Hook's firms designing office buildings for John Love, which may be these.

Greensboro Loan and Trust Company (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1902

Contributors:
Dates: 1902
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 319-321 S. Elm St., Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).
  • Hook and Sawyer, Some Designs by Hook & Sawyer, Architects, Charlotte, N.C. (1902).
Note:

The street level façade has been replaced, but the upper stories of the façade remain as designed by Hook and Sawyer.

Martin Chemical Laboratory Building (Davidson, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Davidson

1901

Contributors:
Dates: 1901
Location: Davidson, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: Davidson College, Davidson, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Mary Norton Kratt and Mary Manning Boyer, Remembering Charlotte: Postcards from a New South City, 1905-1950 (2000).
Note:

Hook and Hook and Sawyer planned several buildings for Davidson College, but none of them is known to survive. The Martin Chemical Laboratory, which housed science facilities, stood until 1941.

Martin Chemical Laboratory Building

Trust Building and Academy of Music (Charlotte, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Charlotte

1901

Contributors:
Dates: 1901-1902
Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: 210-212 S. Tryon St., Charlotte, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Mary Norton Kratt and Mary Manning Boyer, Remembering Charlotte: Postcards from a New South City, 1905-1950 (2000).
  • William T. Simmons and Lindsay L. Brooks, Charlotte and Mecklenburg County: A Pictorial History (1977).
Note:

The ornate 6-story office building, featuring classical and Chateauesque details, was one of the largest and tallest in downtown Charlotte at its completion. It contained an opera house known as the Academy of Music. It burned in 1922. The building is shown at the center of this block.

Trust Building and Academy of Music

Flora McDonald College (Red Springs, Robeson County)

Robeson Red Springs

1900

Contributors:
Dates: 1900-1910
Location: Red Springs, Robeson County
Street Address: College St., Red Springs, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Eastern North Carolina (1996).
Note:

The architects provided a more elaborate composition for the college main building than was actually built.

Flora McDonald College

Martin-McKinnon House (Red Springs, Robeson County)

Robeson Red Springs

1898

Contributors:
Dates: 1898
Location: Red Springs, Robeson County
Street Address: 225 East 3rd Ave., Red Springs, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Spray Inn (Eden, Rockingham County)

Rockingham Eden

1900

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1900
Location: Eden, Rockingham County
Street Address: Eden, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Hook and Sawyer, Some Designs by Hook & Sawyer, Architects, Charlotte, N.C. (1902).
  • M. Ruth Little and Claudia Roberts Brown, A Tale of Three Cities: Eden's Heritage: A Pictorial Survey (1986).
Note:

The Spray Inn, shown in a photograph in Hook and Sawyer (1902) was built for the textile industrial community of Spray, which became part of the town of Eden. It was a long, gambrel roofed building combining Shingle and Colonial Revival styles, with a full-length 1-story porch with stout columns.

Hambley-Wallace House (Salisbury, Rowan County)

Rowan Salisbury

1902

Contributors:
Dates: 1902
Location: Salisbury, Rowan County
Street Address: 508 S. Fulton St., Salisbury, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, North Carolina Architecture (1990).
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Piedmont North Carolina (2003).
Note:

The grand Châteauesque stone and brick residence was built for Egbert Barry Cornwall Hambley, a Cornish-born civil and mining engineer who came to North Carolina to work in gold mining before becoming involved in development of hydroelectric power on the Yadkin River. The house and the grounds make extensive use of granite from quarries owned by Hambley near the present town of Granite Quarry in eastern Rowan County. The scale and elaborateness of the mansion and its grounds made it exceptional in Salisbury and the state. The Salisbury Evening Sun of October 17, 1901 reported that Hambley had let the contract to the Lazenby Brothers for his residence "which Architect Hook says will be one of the finest in North Carolina." "These gentlemen have been among the most successful contractors in North Carolina and the fact that they win out over all other competitors is a credit to them."

Hambley-Wallace House

Blakeney House (Monroe, Union County)

Union Monroe

1903

Contributors:
Dates: 1903
Location: Monroe, Union County
Street Address: 418 E. Franklin St., Monroe, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Carnegie Library (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1904

Contributors:
Dates: 1904-1906
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The Carnegie Library was one of several projects for Hook at present UNCG, where he also planned dormitories and other facilities. It was damaged by fire in 1932 and rebuilt and enlarged in 1933, expanded in 1955, and renovated in the early 21st century.

Grace Episcopal Church (Lexington, Davidson County)

Davidson Lexington

1901

Contributors:
Dates: 1901-1902
Location: Lexington, Davidson County
Street Address: 419 S. Main St., Lexington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious

Grace Episcopal Church

Billingsley Hospital (Statesville, Iredell County)

Iredell Statesville

1899

Contributors:
Dates: 1899-1900
Location: Statesville, Iredell County
Street Address: Park St., Statesville, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Health Care
Note:

The Statesville Record and Landmark of August 13, 1959, carried a historical account by Homer Keever about the Billingsley Hospital, a bequest to the city from a minister named Amos S. Billingsley. Hook and Sawyer were employed as the architects, and the contract went to the Lazenby Brothers. It served for many years and was eventually razed.

Tenth Avenue Presbyterian Church (Charlotte, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Charlotte

1902

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1902
Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: Tenth Ave., Charlotte, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

The Manufacturer's Record of November 14, 1901, said that Lazenby Brothers of Statesville had a contract to build a proposed Graham Street Presbyterian Church in Charlotte after plans by Hook and Sawyer. A year later, an article in the Charlotte News of November 8, 1902, explained that the congregation had decided to build at a new location at the corner of 10th and Pine Streets and to rename the church Tenth Avenue Presbyterian Church. The newspaper printed a drawing of the Gothic Revival church. After that church burned, the congregation moved to another site and became Third Presbyterian Church, which is still active.

Hook and Sawyer's Work Locations

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