North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

Coming Soon

NC Architects and Builders is a growing system. We will post this entry as soon as it is ready.

White, Hugh Edward (1869-1939)

Variant Name(s):
  • Hugh Edward White
Birthplace: Fort Mill, South Carolina, USA
Residences:
  • Rock Hill, South Carolina
  • Gastonia, North Carolina
Trades:
  • Architect
NC Work Locations:
  • Burlington, Alamance County
  • Alamance
  • Kings Mountain, Cleveland County
  • Cleveland
  • Shelby, Cleveland County
  • Cleveland
  • Belmont, Gaston County
  • Gaston
  • Cherryville, Gaston County
  • Gaston
  • Cramerton, Gaston County
  • Gaston
  • Dallas, Gaston County
  • Gaston
  • Gastonia, Gaston County
  • Gaston
  • Lowell, Gaston County
  • Gaston
  • Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
  • Mecklenburg
  • Davidson, Mecklenburg County
  • Mecklenburg
  • Tryon, Polk County
  • Polk
  • Rutherfordton, Rutherford County
  • Rutherford
Building Types:
  • Commercial;
  • Educational;
  • Fraternal;
  • Health Care;
  • Public;
  • Recreational;
  • Religious;
  • Residential;
  • Transportation
Styles & Forms:
  • Art Deco;
  • Beaux-Arts;
  • Colonial Revival;
  • Tudor Revival

Gastonia High School [Gastonia]

View larger image and credits

Gastonia High School [Gastonia]

Biography

Hugh Edward White (June 27, 1869- June 25, 1939), a South Carolina-born architect, worked in various locations before moving about 1920 to the growing textile city of Gastonia, North Carolina, where he became the principal architect in his adopted community. Working in a mainstream Beaux-Arts tradition, he served an emerging clientele among the industrialists and other businessmen of the textile manufacturing region of the western Piedmont. With his partners in the firm of White, Streeter, and Chamberlain from 1921 through 1926 as well as on his own, between 1894 and 1939 White had nearly 300 documented projects in Gastonia and other North Carolina and South Carolina towns.

White was born in Fort Mill in Lancaster County, South Carolina, the only surviving son of Leonidas Spratt White and Dorcas Ann Culp White. He was named for his paternal great-grandfather Hugh White, who was part of a Scotch-Irish settlement group who came from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in the 18th century. After the deaths of their father in 1878 and their mother in 1885, Hugh and his two sisters Margaret Elizabeth and Alice Ann were raised by their aunt, Lizzie Culp, who came to live with them.

Like many architects of his and previous generations, White gained his architectural skills through experience and a correspondence course. A story in the Gastonia Daily Gazette in the 1930s related that White was raised on a farm and was educated at the Fort Mill Academy and through "a special correspondence course in architecture from a N. Y. school." He began his working life "in a wood working plant as a carpenter and advanced to foreman. Later [he] became foreman for a contracting firm in York County, S. C. He took up architectural work in Rock Hill, Chester, Lancaster & Gastonia." Thereafter he went to Atlanta, where he "worked as a draftsman in an architect's office. [He] passed the civil service examinations and became inspector of public buildings for the government in many states." From about 1894 to about 1902 or 1903, and again in 1907-1908, White practiced architecture in Rock Hill, South Carolina. He advertised in the local newspaper as "H. Edward White, Architect," offering to furnish plans, specifications, and estimates for churches, public buildings, stores, and residences, and in 1908 he described himself as an "architect and civil engineer." In Rock Hill, White planned at least twenty residences in Queen Anne and Colonial Revival modes plus a half-dozen commercial buildings, and he also took commissions in other South Carolina communities. For a brief period during the 1890s he worked in an architectural office in Atlanta; the name of the firm has not been ascertained.

From 1903 until 1918 White served as a field supervisor with the Office of the Supervising Architect, Department of the Treasury, the Federal department responsible for designing and constructing Federal buildings throughout the country. In this capacity he moved frequently to supervise projects including post offices in Virginia, Mississippi, and Georgia, as well in as Washington, Hickory, and Gastonia, North Carolina. From 1918 or 1919 into 1921, White worked for the firm of leading South Carolina architect Charles C. Wilson as a draftsman and construction supervisor. Through these experiences he gained a broad knowledge of national architectural styles and systems as well as an understanding of how to adapt these national models to a regional setting.

According to family tradition, Wilson sent White to Gastonia to supervise construction of the Renaissance Revival style Joseph Separk House (1919) for a textile executive. White and his family were residing in Gastonia by the time of the 1920 United States Census, and the 1921-1922 Gastonia city directory first listed Wilson's architectural office in Gastonia, with Hugh White as manager of the office.

White recognized Gastonia's promise as a thriving place where textile industrialists had the money and the will to sponsor architecture expressive of their own and their community's rising stature. In the early years of the century, Gastonia leaders commissioned designs from various architects, including C. C. Hook, Louis H. Asbury, William Peeps, Daniel A. Tompkins and Stuart W. Cramer, all of Charlotte, Frank Pierce Milburn of Washington, D. C., and Charles C. Wilson of Columbia. Hugh White had a long acquaintance with the community, having designed the 1903 Dr. P. Ralph Falls House there, and having resided there while supervising construction of the United States Post Office in the mid-1910s. He evidently made sufficient connections with local leaders to encourage him to establish a firm in Gastonia.

It was not long after coming to town as head of Wilson's office that White, a man just past his fiftieth birthday, decided to make a new start by forming his own architectural partnership and seeking the prize commission for the $500,000 Gastonia High School. His partners in the new firm had also worked in Wilson's office and with the Office of the Supervising Architect of the Treasury: Charles J. Streeter and Carroll W. Chamberlain. Chamberlain, the only one of the partners with a formal architectural education, had a degree in architecture from Syracuse University and practiced in Syracuse before taking the Federal position, while Streeter worked in a New York architectural firm prior to his fifteen years' service in the Office of the Supervising Architect of the Treasury.

Despite some interference from Wilson, the new firm of White, Streeter and Chamberlain won the high school commission and on the strength of that project inaugurated their office in downtown Gastonia. The imposing Tudor Revival High School, one of the finest in the state, established the firm's reputation in Gastonia and the region; even before it was completed and opened in 1924, the partners attracted prestigious residential commissions such as the Samuel Pinckney Stowe House in the nearby textile town of Belmont. The firm secured virtually all the important projects in Gastonia and Gaston County, including educational, public, institutional, commercial, and residential work through the mid-1920s. For years theirs was the only architectural firm with a main office in Gastonia, though others including Charles Coker Wilson's had branch offices there. Their office in Gastonia put them in the heart of a rapidly growing textile manufacturing region, and their clientele soon included industrial and business leaders in such manufacturing towns as Belmont, Kings Mountain, Mount Holly, and Shelby, and the smaller communities of Cherryville, Cramerton, Lowell, and McAdenville. As Hugh White's son Hugh II recalled, during their partnership the trio generally divided responsibilities as follows: White, construction supervision and marketing, Streeter, working drawings, and Chamberlain, specifications. White, who remained in Gastonia through the 1930s, is best recalled in local memory.

The buildings White and his firm designed, as well as those he planned on his own, embodied the Beaux-Arts Classical, Colonial Revival, and Tudor Revival modes popular in America during the interwar period. Typical of the era, White and his firm brought to small cities and towns renditions of these modes suited to the needs and wishes of the local clientele. Their work comprised residences in myriad styles, including textile leaders' Colonial Revival and Tudor Revival mansions and a few small Mediterranean Revival style dwellings. The York-Chester neighborhood, Gastonia's premier early 20th century suburb, offers a showcase of their domestic designs. For educational buildings, the firm employed both the Tudor Revival style--as in their Gastonia High School--and the Neoclassical Revival style, as in White's Consolidated High School for Rutherfordton and Spindale. Their religious buildings, too, were either classical in design, such as the Temple Emanuel Synagogue and the Tryon Presbyterian Church or Gothic Revival. The firm employed a predominantly classical vocabulary for such civic edifices as the Gastonia Municipal Building, and some commercial buildings including the Citizens National Bank in Gastonia. The firm also planned many less elaborate structures including stores and warehouses suited to the practical requirements of the clients and distinguished by well-placed stylish details.

Despite the firm's success, their partnership lasted only through 1926, and by the end of that year Streeter and Chamberlain had left Gastonia. According to White family tradition, the breakup of the firm came about because a huge project they had undertaken--the Oasis Temple Building for Charlotte--was terminated by the client. The firm completed drawings for the immense, classically detailed edifice in 1926; bids for construction, opened in August, ran higher than anticipated; and the directors of the organization decided not to go forward. Apparently the firm, which had focused on the job for many months, went unpaid for much of the time they had invested in it.

After the dissolution of the firm, Hugh White practiced on his own in Gastonia, working out of his office in the Commercial National Bank building until 1930 and later out of an office in his home until his death in 1939. From 1927 until 1930, he served the same client group as before, planning houses and other buildings that continued the scale and character of the firm's previous projects. These included some especially fine Tudor Revival residences, plus schools, religious buildings, and civic and health facilities. He also introduced new themes in the Art Deco-Moderne style Webb Theater and the Gastonia War Memorial, which combined a fortress-like central tower with arcaded porch.

For White as for most architects, commissions dropped off radically during the Great Depression, and he and his family experienced hard times along with millions of others. His records show only a few projects during the period 1931-1934. In 1931 he kept busy with another project, researching and publishing a detailed "Industrial and Farm Map of Gaston County, North Carolina" which he peddled throughout the county for cash or farmers' fresh produce. As economic conditions improved, White reinvigorated his practice and moved his office from his home to the National Bank of Commerce in downtown Gastonia. Reflecting the still straitened economic situation, he designed many residences at a reduced scale compared to his earlier work and did several additions and renovations to existing buildings. To attract clients with restricted budgets, he featured in his promotional booklet of 1936 designs for modest dwellings in Tudor and Colonial Revival modes. He also planned at least one modernist residence, the Clarence A. Ross House. The late 1930s also brought important public commissions, several of which were funded at least in part by the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works. Among these were the Gastonia Colored High School, the Gastonia Junior High School, the Consolidated High School for Rutherfordton and Spindale, and the Cramerton Gymnasium. During his last years White also planned buildings for the campus of the North Carolina Orthopaedic Hospital and designed the Gaston County Negro Hospital, both important landmarks of interwar Gastonia.

Hugh White died on June 25, 1939, just two days short of his seventieth birthday, leaving a city distinguished by the architecture he had created. The Gastonia Daily Gazette of June 26 reported that Gastonia and Gaston County had lost "one of their finest citizens" and noted, "Although not a native of Gaston County, Mr. White had become thoroughly acclimated and had become affiliated with every forward looking movement in the county." White was buried in Hollywood Cemetery in Gastonia. His widow, Mary Green White, survived him until 1948. White's son, Hugh Edward White (II) followed in his father's profession. He had worked in his father's office for a time during the 1930s and in 1940 he enrolled at the Georgia Institute of Technology to study architecture. He worked with Walter Hook Associates before establishing the firm of Freeman White Associates in Charlotte.

Editor's Note: This account and the building list are drawn from "The Works of Hugh Edward White and White, Streeter & Chamberlain" (2005), prepared by Lucy R. Penegar and Jane Alice Todd, with content by Davyd Foard Hood, from Hood's National Register of Historic Places Documentation Form for the works of Hugh Edward White and White, Streeter, and Chamberlain. The building list is selective, highlighting White's best known works, a range of types and locales, and buildings selected for local historic designation, the National Register of Historic Places, or the National Register Study List. A much fuller building list and more detailed biography may be found in the documents cited.

Authors: Davyd Foard Hood and Lucy R. Penegar. Editor: Catherine W. Bishir. Contributors: Hugh E. White (II), and Hugh E. White, Jr. (III).

Published 2011

Building List

Joseph Separk House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1919

Contributors:
Dates: 1919
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 209 W. 2nd Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).
Note:

Manufacturers' Record, Sept. 4, 1919. Wilson sent architect Hugh White to Gastonia to supervise construction of the elaborate Renaissance Revival residence, and White soon established his own long-lasting practice in Gastonia and planned many of its key buildings of the early 20th century. The landscape architect was Earle Sumner Draper, who planned many suburban and industrial settings in Piedmont North Carolina.

Bank of Belmont (Belmont, Gaston County)

Gaston Belmont

1926

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1926
Location: Belmont, Gaston County
Street Address: 32 N. Main St., Belmont, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).

Samuel Pinckney Stowe House (Belmont, Gaston County)

Gaston Belmont

1924

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1924
Location: Belmont, Gaston County
Street Address: 217 S. Central Ave., Belmont, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).
Note:

The Stowe House burned shortly after its completion and was rebuilt from the same and supplementary plans. It is similar in design to the 1919-1921 Abel Caleb Lineberger Sr. House II, also in Belmont, designed by Charles Christian Hook.

T. D. Cooper House (Burlington, Alamance County)

Alamance Burlington

1926

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1926
Location: Burlington, Alamance County
Street Address: 623 Fountain Place, Burlington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Allison Harris Black, An Architectural History of Burlington, North Carolina (1987).
Note:

The T. D. Cooper House project, with drawings dated April 12, 1926, is the last known residential commission by White, Streeter and Chamberlain. As noted in Allison Black, An Architectural History of Burlington, North Carolina (1987), this is the T. D. Cooper House at 623 Fountain Place: according to Mrs. Cooper, her future husband had admired a house in her home town of Gastonia, which had been designed by Hugh White, and wanted to have one like it.

Oasis Temple Building (Charlotte, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Charlotte

1926

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1926
Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: Dilworth St. and Morehead St., Charlotte, NC
Status: Unbuilt
Type:
  • Fraternal
Note:

Family tradition states that it was the termination of this large project that brought the end of the firm's practice.

Noah Benjamin Kendrick House (Cherryville, Gaston County)

Gaston Cherryville

1925

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1925
Location: Cherryville, Gaston County
Street Address: 402 N. Mountain St., Cherryville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Cramerton Gymnasium (Cramerton, Gaston County)

Gaston Cramerton

1939

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1939
Location: Cramerton, Gaston County
Street Address: 1 Julian St., Cramerton, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Recreational
Note:

The Cramerton Gymnasium was among Hugh White's last projects.

Dallas Gymnasium (Dallas, Gaston County)

Gaston Dallas

1938

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1938
Location: Dallas, Gaston County
Street Address: S. Oakland St., Dallas, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Recreational

Addison G. Mangum House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1923

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1923
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 215 E. Franklin Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).
Note:

The Mangum House is one of several major remodeling projects that transformed an existing house into one representative of the firm.

Benjamin E. Atkins House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1920

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, attributed architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, attributed architect;
  • Hugh E. White, attributed architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, attributed architects
Dates: 1920s
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 112 Belvedere Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

This is one of several houses in Gastonia credited locally to White's firm but not documented in the firm's records.

Calvary Baptist Church (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1923

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1923
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: S. York Rd., Gastonia, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Religious

Citizens National Bank (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1924

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1924
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 210-220 W. Main Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Piedmont North Carolina (2003).
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).
Note:

The imposing Beaux-Arts classical bank with triumphal arched entrance flanked by Corinthian columns is a landmark of Gastonia and one of the firm's premier works in the classical mode.

Citizens National Bank

Clyde C. Armstrong House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1925

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1925
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 519 S. York St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Frederick Barley House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1922

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: Ca. 1922
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 211 W. 2nd St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Gastonia Colored High School (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1935

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1935
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 535 N. York St., Gastonia, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational

Gastonia High School (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1922

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1922-1924
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 800 S. York St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir, North Carolina Architecture (1990).
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Piedmont North Carolina (2003).
Note:

Gastonia High School, one of the finest public high schools built in the state in the early 20th century, was the first project for White, Streeter, and Chamberlain, and established their new firm's reputation. It has been renovated for residential use.

Gastonia High School

Gastonia Junior High School (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1938

Variant Name(s):
  • Yorkchester Junior High School
Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1938
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 601 S. Clay St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Educational

Gastonia Municipal Building (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1925

Variant Name(s):
  • Gastonia City Hall
Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • C. W. Spencer, contractor;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1925
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 240 W. Franklin Blvd., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).
Note:

The neoclassically detailed civic edifice is among the firm's most important buildings in Gastonia.

J. H. Kellar House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1923

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • A. C. Miller, contractor;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: Ca. 1923
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 711 S. New Hope Rd., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

John L. Beal House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1923

Variant Name(s):
  • Beal-Ragan House
Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1923
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 706 S. York St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Piedmont North Carolina (2003).
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).

John R. Rankin House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1924

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1924
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 304 W. 5th Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Peter W. Garland House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1925

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1925
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 510 S. York St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

R. Cope Gray House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1924

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1924
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 221 W. 5th Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Robinson School (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1936

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1936
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 3122 Union Rd., Gastonia, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).

Samuel A. Robinson House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1922

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, attributed architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, attributed architect;
  • Hugh E. White, attributed architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, attributed architects
Dates: Ca. 1922
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 310 S. York St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).
Note:

This is one of several houses in Gastonia credited locally to White's firm but not documented in the firm's records.

Standard Hardware Building (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1920

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1920s
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 148-156 South St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

Although White and his firm designed a great many commercial buildings, few still stand; this straightforward, 3-story brick building with pilasters and triple windows is a good and typical example that survives.

Temple Emanuel Synagogue (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1925

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1925
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 320 South St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).

Van A. Covington House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1920

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, attributed architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, attributed architect;
  • Hugh E. White, attributed architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, attributed architects
Dates: 1920s
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 1200 block Belvedere Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

This is one of several houses in Gastonia credited locally to White's firm but not documented in the firm's records.

W. P. Grier School (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1923

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: Ca. 1923
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: E. Garrison Blvd., Gastonia, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational

W. Thomas Love House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1922

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • J. F. Clemmer, contractor;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: Ca. 1922
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 301 S. Chester St., Gastonia, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Residential

Lowell School (Lowell, Gaston County)

Gaston Lowell

1937

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1937
Location: Lowell, Gaston County
Street Address: Lowell, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational

Consolidated High School for Rutherfordton and Spindale (Rutherfordton, Rutherford County)

Rutherford Rutherfordton

1924

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1924
Location: Rutherfordton, Rutherford County
Street Address: Charlotte Rd., Rutherfordton, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The Consolidated High School for Rutherfordton and Spindale is one of the most substantial and the most intact of many public schools the firm designed, many of which have been destroyed or drastically changed.

First Baptist Church Educational Building (Shelby, Cleveland County)

Cleveland Shelby

1927

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: Ca. 1927
Location: Shelby, Cleveland County
Street Address: 120 N. Lafayette St., Shelby, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

The large educational building is one of several additions White or his firm designed for prominent churches.

Tryon Presbyterian Church (Tryon, Polk County)

Polk Tryon

1925

Contributors:
  • Carroll W. Chamberlain, architect;
  • Charles J. Streeter, architect;
  • Hugh E. White, architect;
  • White, Streeter and Chamberlain, architects
Dates: 1925
Location: Tryon, Polk County
Street Address: Tryon, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

The church was later used as a Masonic hall.

William S. Patterson House (Davidson, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Davidson

1933

Contributors:
Dates: 1933
Location: Davidson, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: Lorimer Rd., Davidson, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Residential

Benjamin N. Duke Memorial Ward for Colored Children (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1930

Contributors:
Dates: 1930
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: North Carolina Orthopaedic Hospital, Gastonia, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Health Care
Note:

One of several buildings White designed at the North Carolina Orthopaedic Hospital Campus in the 1930s. The Duke family and the Duke Endowment aided many health and educational facilities for both black and white citizens as well as Methodist churches.

Charles S. Thompson House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1927

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1927
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 2411 Armstrong Circle, Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Colored Nurses Home (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1937

Contributors:
Dates: 1937
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: North Carolina Orthopaedic Hospital, Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Health Care
Note:

This was one of several buildings White designed at the North Carolina Orthopaedic Hospital Campus in the 1930s.

Dr. P. Ralph Falls House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1903

Contributors:
Dates: 1903
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 215 S. York St., Gastonia, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

The Falls house was White's first known project in Gastonia or North Carolina.

Gaston County Negro Hospital (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1937

Contributors:
Dates: 1937
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 721 N. Marietta St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Health Care
Note:

The hospital later became a private rest home.

Gastonia Mill Supply Building (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1920

Contributors:
Dates: 1920s
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 613 E. Franklin Blvd., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial

Gastonia Public Library (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1930

Contributors:
Dates: 1930
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 115 W. 2nd St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public
Note:

After years of service as a library the building was made into the city police station in the 1980s.

Gastonia War Memorial (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1928

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1928
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 113 W. 2nd St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public
Note:

The unusual building was one of White's first big projects after the firm split up in 1927.

Hugh Edward White House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1920

Contributors:
Dates: 1920s
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 207 W. 4th St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

White remodeled an existing house to create a picturesque, multi-gabled residence of 1 1/2 stories.

John C. Roberts House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1935

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1935
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 611 Lee St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Martin Henry Epps House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1935

Contributors:
Dates: 1935
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 710 Lee St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

The multi-gabled, 1 1/2-story brick house is representative of the several modest residences White designed in the 1930s.

Moore and Stewart Store and Warehouse (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1927

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1927
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 121-127 E. Franklin Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

One of several functional buildings White planned for textile industrialists.

Paul P. Kincaid House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1938

Contributors:
Dates: 1938
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 435 Collier St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

One of Hugh White's last residential projects.

Samuel N. Boyce House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1927

Contributors:
Dates: 1927-1928
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 301 S. York St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).

Webb Theater (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1927

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1927
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 182-190 South St., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The Art Deco-Moderne style theater is one of the firm's few essays in that mode.

F. R. Summers House (Kings Mountain, Cleveland County)

Cleveland Kings Mountain

1927

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1927
Location: Kings Mountain, Cleveland County
Street Address: 1220 Piedmont Ave., Kings Mountain, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

An especially picturesque rendition of the half-timbered Tudor Cottage mode.

Clarence A. Ross House (Gastonia, Gaston County)

Gaston Gastonia

1936

Contributors:
Dates: 1936
Location: Gastonia, Gaston County
Street Address: 116 Cumberland Ave., Gastonia, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Hugh E. White's Work Locations

Bibliography

  • Kim Withers Brengle, The Architectural Heritage of Gaston County, North Carolina (1982).
  • Charlotte Vestal Brown Papers, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, North Carolina.
  • Davyd Foard Hood, National Register of Historic Places Multiple Properties Documentation Form for the works of Hugh Edward White and White, Streeter, and Chamberlain (1997).
  • Manufacturers' Record, various issues.
  • Lucy R. Penegar and Jane Alice Todd, with content by Davyd Foard Hood, The Works of Hugh Edward White and White, Streeter & Chamberlain (2005).
  • Hugh Edward White I records, private collection, notes by Davyd Foard Hood and Lucy R. Penegar.
Text Only

Brought to you by The NCSU Libraries and The NCSU Libraries Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center.

Please contact us with any additions, corrections, or updates.

Giving to the Libraries