North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Weeks, H. Raymond (1901-1956)

Variant Name(s):
  • Howard Raymond Weeks
Birthplace: Palmyra, Missouri, USA
Residences:
  • Durham, North Carolina
Trades:
  • Architect
NC Work Locations:
  • Durham, Durham County
  • Durham
  • Chapel Hill, Orange County
  • Orange
  • Wake County
  • Wake
  • Raleigh, Wake County
  • Wake
Building Types:
  • Educational;
  • Public;
  • Transportation
Styles & Forms:
  • Beaux-Arts;
  • Georgian Revival;
  • International style;
  • Neoclassical Revival

United States Post Office [Durham]

View larger image and credits

United States Post Office [Durham]

Biography

H. (Howard) Raymond Weeks (August 18, 1901-October 27, 1956) came to North Carolina not long after graduating in architecture from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and practiced in the Tar Heel state for the rest of his career. As a partner of Thomas C. Atwood in Atwood and Weeks and on his own, he was especially well known for educational and state government buildings.

Weeks was born in Palmyra, Missouri, to Howard L. and Musella Robert Weeks; the family later resided in South Carolina. After graduating from Georgia Tech in 1923, Raymond worked for the Atlanta architectural firm of Robert and Company. He soon moved to North Carolina, where he was employed as a draftsman by the T. C. Atwood Organization during the major expansion of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the 1920s, working with chief engineer Thomas C. Atwood and architect Arthur C. Nash, and he also worked for the firm of Atwood and Nash. The Daily Tar Heel of March 8, 1930, reported that Weeks had been "notified by the state board of registration of architects that he has passed with honor the state examination and will be issued a c[e]rtificate as licensed architect. Mr. Weeks is at present in the service of the firm of Atwood and Nash, Inc., architects and engineers of Chapel Hill."

The professional relationships within the firm must have been satisfactory, for after Nash retired in 1930, Atwood formed a partnership with the newly licensed Raymond Weeks as Atwood and Weeks, with Nash often serving in a consulting capacity for many years. In 1930, the census showed Weeks as head of a household that included his wife, Elsie, and their infant daughter, Patricia. Despite the crash of 1929 and the ensuing Great Depression, Atwood and Weeks found some key projects in the early 1930s, most prominently Raleigh's Memorial Auditorium and the United States Post Office in Durham. The latter was such a substantial project that according to the Durham Sun of October 5, 1931, in preparation for supervising the work, "the main office of Atwood and Weeks, architects, was today moved to Durham from Chapel Hill." The firm would keep a branch office in Chapel Hill, as it still had "much work to do for the state university."

Weeks was active in professional organizations in the state. He was the first president of the North Carolina Architects Association, which merged with the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, of which he became a member in 1938. He served as president of the state chapter of the AIA in 1945. In an especially important role, Weeks chaired the State College (present NCSU) accreditation committee for the School of Architecture and in 1948 made a report to the state AIA chapter that Henry L. Kamphoefner had been selected as dean of the new School of Design, a selection that would shape the future of the school along modernist lines.

Practicing on his own after Atwood's retirement and death, Weeks continued to plan and execute state buildings and schools. Projects included work at the University of North Carolina, Davidson College, and Meredith College as well as public school buildings in Durham and Rocky Mount. At UNC he was especially active in planning dormitories and other structures needed to accommodate the postwar demand for student housing.

In association with engineer William C. Olsen, Weeks also planned one of the first major buildings at the Raleigh-Durham Airport. Plans dated 1954 for the airport "administrative building" show that it contained the waiting rooms, baggage rooms, restrooms, etc., so that it served as the passenger terminal as well as administrative offices; these are in the Harris and Pyne Records at NCSU Libraries Special Collections. (Previously, an article in the High Point Enterprise of June 18, 1952 cited George Watts Carr and Olsen as architects and engineer of a proposed passenger terminal at the Raleigh-Durham airport.)

Weeks was working on plans for buildings at the university on a tight deadline just days before his sudden death from a heart attack at age 55. He was survived by his wife, Elsie, and was buried in Durham's Maplewood Cemetery. According to a tribute to Weeks in the Durham Sun, he was an "active and energetic" force in community affairs including the establishment of building codes and "the elimination of substandard housing."

Harris and Pyne of Durham became a successor firm to H. Raymond Weeks, Inc. Some drawings, photographs, and other records from Atwood and Nash, Atwood and Weeks, and Raymond Weeks are included in the Harris and Pyne records at NCSU Libraries Special Collections.

Author: Catherine W. Bishir.

Published 2015

Building List

Gerrard Hall (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1822

Variant Name(s):
  • New Chapel
Contributors:
Dates: 1822-1837; 1858 [improvements]; 1938 [internally reconstructed]
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • John V. Allcott, The Campus at Chapel Hill: Two Hundred Years of Architecture (1986).
  • M. Ruth Little, The Town and Gown Architecture of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1795-1975 (2006).
  • C. Ford Peatross, William Nichols, Architect (1979).
  • William S. Powell, The First State University: A Pictorial History of the University of North Carolina (1992).
Note:

As built from Nichols's design, Gerrard Hall included an imposing Ionic portico on one side; the portico was removed ca. 1900, and recreated in 2007-2008. The hall was rebuilt internally in the 1930s.

Spencer Hall (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1924

Contributors:
Dates: 1924; 1958 (addition)
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • M. Ruth Little, The Town and Gown Architecture of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1795-1975 (2006).
  • William S. Powell, The First State University: A Pictorial History of the University of North Carolina (1992).
Note:

For the original Spencer Hall, 32 sheets of blueprints from Atwood and Nash are at University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill, in Collection Number 40102 ("Physical Plant of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, 1904-1963"). For the 1958 addition, that collection includes 16 sheets of blueprints by H. Raymond Weeks.

Spencer Hall

Egbert Haywood House (Durham, Durham County)

Durham Durham

1940

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1940
Location: Durham, Durham County
Street Address: 28 Oak Dr., Durham, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Residential

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Wade House (Durham, Durham County)

Durham Durham

1952

Contributors:
Dates: 1952
Location: Durham, Durham County
Street Address: Durham, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

The Harris and Pyne collection, NCSU Libraries Special Collections, includes drawings by "H. Raymond Weeks, Inc., Architects and Engineers, Durham," for a residence for Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Wade. They show an expansive ranch house with Colonial Revival detailing. Wallace Wade was a longtime football coach at Duke University for whom the university's football stadium is named.

Gardner Hall (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1953

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1953
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The Chapel Hill Daily Tar Heel reported on May 5, 1953 on the dedication of three new buildings at the University of North Carolina, which had been designed by "Durham architect and engineer" Weeks and built by the J. A. Jones Construction Company of Charlotte. Named Carroll Hall, Gardner Hall, and Hanes Hall, the three were built for the School of Business Administration, as the former School of Commerce was renamed in 1950. The trio formed a secondary quadrangle extending from Polk Place as a complement to the earlier one across Polk Place which centers on Manning Hall.

Carroll Hall (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1953

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1953
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The Chapel Hill Daily Tar Heel reported on May 5, 1953 on the dedication of three new buildings at the University of North Carolina, which had been designed by "Durham architect and engineer" Weeks and built by the J. A. Jones Construction Company of Charlotte. Named Carroll Hall, Gardner Hall, and Hanes Hall, the three were built for the School of Business Administration, as the former School of Commerce was renamed in 1950. The trio formed a secondary quadrangle extending from Polk Place as a complement to the earlier one across Polk Place which centers on Manning Hall.

Hanes Hall (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1953

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1953
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The Chapel Hill Daily Tar Heel reported on May 5, 1953 on the dedication of three new buildings at the University of North Carolina, which had been designed by "Durham architect and engineer" Weeks and built by the J. A. Jones Construction Company of Charlotte. Named Carroll Hall, Gardner Hall, and Hanes Hall, the three were built for the School of Business Administration, as the former School of Commerce was renamed in 1950. The trio formed a secondary quadrangle extending from Polk Place as a complement to the earlier one across Polk Place which centers on Manning Hall.

Dormitory (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1948

Contributors:
Dates: 1948
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Psychiatric Hospital (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1951

Contributors:
Dates: 1951
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Medical Center, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Health Care

Ackland Art Museum (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1953

Contributors:
Dates: 1953
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: 101 South Columbia Street, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Raleigh-Durham Airport Administrative Building (Wake County)

Wake

1954

Contributors:
Dates: 1954-1955
Location: Wake County
Street Address: Wake County, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The plans dated 1954 show that the "Administrative Building" contained all the elements of a passenger terminal as well as offices. Whether any elements of that building survive in the extensively altered terminal is unknown; it is slated for demolition.

United States Post Office (Durham, Durham County)

Durham Durham

1934

Contributors:
Dates: 1934
Location: Durham, Durham County
Street Address: 323 E. Chapel Hill St., Durham, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public

United States Post Office

Memorial Auditorium (Raleigh, Wake County)

Wake Raleigh

1932

Contributors:
Dates: 1932; 1996-2001
Location: Raleigh, Wake County
Street Address: South St. at south end of Fayetteville St., Raleigh, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Public
Note:

Construction of the massive civic auditorium at the south terminus of Raleigh's principal commercial thoroughfare was a highly important project, especially given its timing in the early years of the Great Depression. Various architects hoped to gain the commission. The News and Observer reported on July 9, 1931, that Atwood and Weeks of Chapel Hill and Raleigh had been selected as the architects, noted that the firm was "formerly Atwood and Nash." The Raleigh Times of October 22, 1931, stated that contractor C. V. York was awarded the general contract on a bid of $225,696; additional contracts covered plumbing, heating, etc. The stone edifice with its powerful Doric portico was dedicated in May, 1932. An expansion by Pearce Brinkley Cease + Lee harmonizes with the original building and reiterates the Doric portico designed to relate to the State Capitol at the opposite end of Fayetteville Street; the building was reopened in 2001.

Memorial Auditorium

Alderman Hall (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1937

Contributors:
Dates: 1937
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

Blueprints for this project are held by the University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill, in Collection Number 40102, "Physical Plant of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, 1904-1963."

Woollen Gym (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1937

Contributors:
Dates: 1937
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Lenoir Dining Hall (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1939

Contributors:
Dates: 1939
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Kenan Dormitory (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1937

Contributors:
Dates: 1937-1939
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

Blueprints for Kenan Hall are at the University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill, in Collection Number 40102, "Physical Plant of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, 1904-1963."

McIver Dormitory (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1937

Contributors:
Dates: 1937-1939
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

For McIver Hall, 10 sheets of blueprints from Atwood and Weeks are held by the University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill, in Collection Number 40102, "Physical Plant of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, 1904-1963."

Wilson Hall (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1939

Contributors:
Dates: 1939
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Alexander Dormitory (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1939

Contributors:
Dates: 1939
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Institute of Government (Chapel Hill, Orange County)

Orange Chapel Hill

1939

Contributors:
Dates: 1939
Location: Chapel Hill, Orange County
Street Address: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus, Chapel Hill, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

H. Raymond Weeks's Work Locations

Bibliography

  • Harris and Pyne Collection, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, North Carolina.
  • Archibald Henderson, The Campus of the First State University (1949).
  • C. David Jackson and Charlotte V. Brown, History of the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, 1913-1998 (1998).
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