North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Boney, Leslie N., Sr. (1880-1964)

Variant Name(s):
  • Leslie Norwood Boney, Sr.
Birthplace: Wallace, NC, USA
Residences:
  • Wilmington, North Carolina
  • Goldsboro, North Carolina
  • Wallace, North Carolina
Trades:
  • Architect
NC Work Locations:
  • Whiteville, Columbus County
  • Columbus
  • New Bern, Craven County
  • Craven
  • Fayetteville, Cumberland County
  • Cumberland
  • Chinquapin, Duplin County
  • Duplin
  • Kenansville, Duplin County
  • Duplin
  • Kornegay, Duplin County
  • Duplin
  • Wallace, Duplin County
  • Duplin
  • Raeford, Hoke County
  • Hoke
  • Graingers, Lenoir County
  • Lenoir
  • Kinston, Lenoir County
  • Lenoir
  • La Grange, Lenoir County
  • Lenoir
  • Carolina Beach, New Hanover County
  • New Hanover
  • Wilmington, New Hanover County
  • New Hanover
  • Jacksonville, Onslow County
  • Onslow
  • Burgaw, Pender County
  • Pender
  • Hertford, Perquimans County
  • Perquimans
  • Ayden, Pitt County
  • Pitt
  • Greenville, Pitt County
  • Pitt
  • Raleigh, Wake County
  • Wake
  • Wake Forest, Wake County
  • Wake
  • Goldsboro, Wayne County
  • Wayne
Building Types:
  • Commercial;
  • Educational;
  • Health Care;
  • Public;
  • Religious;
  • Residential
Styles & Forms:
  • Georgian Revival;
  • Modernist;
  • Neoclassical Revival

Biography

Leslie Norwood Boney, Sr. (October 29, 1880-September 18, 1964), was a highly prolific Wilmington architect whose practice covered a wide range of building types but concentrated on educational facilities including some 1,000 educational buildings and additions. Although much of his work was in eastern North Carolina, his designs appeared in 51 of the state's 100 counties.

Leslie Boney was born in Wallace, North Carolina, one of six surviving children of William Joseph Boney (December 27, 1839-September 13, 1911) and Lou Ellen Alford Boney (August 12, 1841-July 11, 1924) of Robeson County. William Joseph Boney was a well-known Duplin County merchant, farmer, and surveyor. Leslie worked on his father's farm until he was eighteen years old. He gained his primary and secondary education from Samuel Wilson Clements, a private schoolmaster employed by local families, who was Boney's only teacher until he entered the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (present NCSU) in Raleigh in 1899.

Boney enrolled in the textile school, probably at the suggestion of his uncle, Gabriel James Boney, a Wilmington merchant and miller who saw a bright future in this emerging industry. During his junior year, Boney visited a textile mill for the first time, and after determining that the noise, confinement, and dust would not suit him, he decided against a textile career. He enjoyed drawing, and his talent, probably inherited from or at least encouraged by his surveyor father, was recognized by the college faculty. At that time, as noted in Architects and Builders in North Carolina: A History of the Practice of Building, the college did not have a degree program in architecture; the only architectural training courses offered were those in engineering and mechanical drawing. (An architectural engineering program was added in 1920.) Boney took all the architecturally related courses he could and in 1903 received a bachelor's degree in textile engineering, as did architect James M. Kennedy.

After completing his college work, Boney worked in several different settings before establishing his architectural practice in Wilmington. Upon graduation, he was offered a position with Cone Mills but decided instead to work in a Greensboro architect's office (thus far unidentified). He soon moved to Wilmington where from 1904 to 1906 he was an architectural draftsman for Charles McMillen, who had moved to the city a few years earlier and was a leading figure in the city's profession. Boney particularly credited McMillen with giving him a sound knowledge of construction.

Family tradition holds that in 1906 Boney returned to Wallace where he worked as assistant cashier of the Bank of Wallace and its successor, the Consolidated Bank of Duplin, until 1909. During these banking years he is said to have designed several bank buildings in southeastern North Carolina including the Bank of Wallace and others in Burgaw, Jacksonville, and Rose Hill. He may also have designed a brick school in Wallace. Boney is also said to have practiced architecture in Goldsboro planning several buildings including the Borden Building and the North Goldsboro Fire Station, as well as additions to the Temple Oheb Sholom Synagogue, and the Odd Fellows Home. From 1919 to 1920, Boney worked with architect William J. Wilkins of Florence, South Carolina. In an especially prominent project during his association with Wilkins, he supervised construction of the New Hanover County High School (1920-1922), an imposing and up-to-date facility that symbolized the city's investment in education. (Boney also planned three major additions to the high school over the following decades.) In 1922 Boney worked as a draftsman with Wilmington architect James F. Gause. During his time with Gause he planned the Cape Fear Country Club in Wilmington and at least seven elementary and high schools from the coast to the mountains. Among these were New Bern's Riverside Elementary School and Ghent School Elementary School , which were credited as being the first "fire resistant" elementary schools in eastern North Carolina. These projects were underway when Gause died in June 1922, and Boney saw to their completion.

By 1924 Boney opened his own architectural office in Wilmington and he practiced continuously under the name of "Leslie N. Boney, Architect," until his own death in 1964. His three sons, Leslie N., Jr., William J., and Charles H. joined him as partners as each graduated from NCSU. Their firm was described as the only architectural partnership in the nation at that time consisting of a father and three architect sons. (Note: The Boney family practice after the death of the founder of the firm will be the subject of another biographical entry in the future.)

From early in his career, Boney was motivated to study and devote his talents to school design, which proved to be a wise choice in the early to mid-20th century era of widespread school construction and consolidation. Lenoir County, which was among the first counties in the state to inaugurate consolidated high schools in the 1910s, built several large and small schools during the Progressive Era, employing Boney to design a good number of them. These included the Moss Hill High School (ca. 1917), the first and one of the largest of Lenoir County's consolidated high schools, and Kinston's Grainger High School (1926), which was among the region's premier urban public schools of its day.

As his son Leslie, Jr., recalled, Leslie, Sr.'s major contribution was as a "school architect who could take an owner's needs and his budgets and quickly deliver a new school within the funds available. He was especially interested in the statewide effort to improve schools and became a leader in the development of consolidated schools to replace the previous era's many one-room schools." Boney was noted as an accomplished draftsman, "whose speed and accuracy enabled him to accomplish a great deal of design work. Sometimes he, like other architects, would illustrate a point by drawing on whatever was handy for his pencil, be it a 1x6 plank on the job or a paper napkin on the train." Boney's school designs were "always simple. His schools of the 1920s and 1930s were usually of red brick with bearing exterior walls, white trim, and classical porticoes. A favorite ornament, a row of three diamonds or lozenges, is an identifying characteristic of his schools. The interior framing was of wood, and the typical plan included smoke towers and vestibules on the ends of the corridors. When he employed built-up roofs, he typically used a steep slope to the rear which eliminated ponding and reduced leak potential. The drawn plans were straightforward and readily understood by the builders. The student and the public readily comprehended his buildings, find the entrance, and proceed through the spaces in a logical manner."

Many of Boney's solidly built, classically detailed brick schools, once centerpieces of their communities, have been razed within the last few decades as new standards for school planning have been adopted; a few have been maintained and renovated as schools, while others have been put into new uses. The attached building list includes only a sampling of the firm's educational output; more examples are shown in the Leslie N. Boney Collection (Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries).

In addition to the firm's many public schools, Boney also planned large college buildings. Described as the state's largest college dorm of its day, his 820-bed Bragaw Dormitory (1955) at his alma mater, NCSU, modeled an 8-student suite plan that became a popular form for student housing. (After his death, his firm was commissioned in 1965 to plan an 808-student NCSU dorm to be named for Boney, but it was not built.) One of his last projects, aptly, was the new campus for Wilmington College Campus (1963) planned as a series of courts on a suburban site outside Wilmington; the school is now the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Here Boney used his favorite, formal Neoclassical Revival style of red brick buildings in Flemish bond brickwork, sloping slate roofs, and columns featuring the Tower of the Winds order which he had long admired.

Beyond the specialty in schools, during his forty years of practice in Wilmington, Boney's firm planned buildings of many different types in Wilmington and across the state. His residential work included several substantial residences in Wilmington and other towns, as well as beach cottages as Wrightsville Beach near Wilmington. A prominent local project shortly after he established his own firm was the New Hanover County Courthouse Annex (1924-1925), in which he was associated with consulting architect Herbert C. Chivers of New York; the stone-faced, Beaux-Arts classical design features a full-height portico with columns in the order of the Tower of the Winds, an order long favored in Wilmington (see John Norris and James F. Post) and which Boney employed frequently. A pioneer in large-scale housing, in 1939 Boney designed New Brooklyn Homes (Taylor Homes) in Wilmington as one of the state's first public housing projects. Boney was both architect and part owner of Wilmington's Oleander Court Apartments (1941), a garden type apartment complex of 92 units, which featured classical styling, spacious rooms, and generous site planning.

Boney's church designs included the Wallace Presbyterian Church (1909) planned during his banking years there; and Trinity Methodist Church (1920-1921) in Wilmington, probably designed during his association with Wilkins. For St. Andrew's on the Sound, an Episcopal church serving residents of the nearby old soundside resort communities, he employed a cheery Spanish Revival style. When the sanctuary of Wilmington's long-established congregation of St. Luke's A. M. E. Church burned in 1944, Boney provided a design for their new building, which was completed promptly despite wartime limitations on building materials. The firm's Little Chapel on the Boardwalk (1951) at Wrightsville Beach, for which Leslie's son Charles was lead designer, was hailed as the first "contemporary" church in the state east of Raleigh, won state and regional AIA design awards, and was featured in Progressive Architecture.

At a time when health facilities were expanding statewide, Boney like other architects designed numerous hospitals and medical facilities. In 1938 he designed the Columbus County Hospital, and in 1960, an addition. Probably in response to the 1946 Hill-Burton Act which offered Federal funds to build and improve hospitals, in 1948 he designed a facility to add more beds and a surgical unit for Wilmington's James Walker Memorial Hospital. He followed this with the Pender Memorial Hospital and the Duplin General Hospital in 1950 and 1960, respectively. Before and during World War II, Boney was involved in the 1940 land acquisition survey and schools for Camp LeJeune Marine Base and in military construction including the William C. Lee Field House at Fort Bragg.

Long active in church, community and professional life, Boney was a ruling elder, deacon, and Sunday school teacher at the First Presbyterian Church in Wilmington. He was active in the growing preservation movement in Wilmington, and his own residence, the antebellum Wessell-Hathaway House (see James F. Post) was rehabilitated under his direction in 1940, with the architectural office in the basement. In the early 1950s, Boney's diplomacy and creativity helped spare the Kenan Fountain at 5th and Market Streets in Wilmington from obscurity. Traffic had increased and state transportation officials wanted to remove the fountain from the intersection in order to widen the traffic lanes. They proposed to reinstall the fountain in Greenfield Park. Boney countered with a proposal to remove the lowest ring of pools, allowing the rest of the fountain to remain intact in the intersection. His proposal was accepted and the landmark was preserved in situ.

Leslie N. Boney married Mary Lily Hussey of Wallace on June 6, 1917. The couple resided in Wallace and he commuted weekly to Wilmington until they moved to the port city in 1922. Leslie and Mary Lily Boney had five children: Mary Lily; Leslie, Jr.; William Joseph, Charles Hussey, and Sue Alford. The family resided at 412 Central Boulevard, 425 S. 3rd Street, 221 S. 5th Street, and 120 S. 5th Street. The Leslie N. Boney House at 425 S. 3rd Street, built in 1925, is a Georgian Revival brick residence of Boney's own design, which originally featured Tower of the Winds columns. The firm Boney established continued after his death and was known for several years as Boney Architects, operated by his three sons and three grandsons, Paul Davis Boney, Charles H. Boney, Jr., and Christopher Boney. In 2005 the firm became LS3P.

The building list represents only a fraction of Boney's extensive work and is intended to show his best-known buildings and a representative selection of types and locales for which status and location can be identified. A more complete listing of his work appears in the finding guide for the Leslie N. Boney Architectural Papers at the Special Collection Research Center at North Carolina State University Libraries, a collection that includes papers of both Leslie N. Boney, Sr., and Leslie N. Boney, Jr. This biographical entry was drafted by Leslie N. Boney, Jr. (1920-2003), and the building list was assembled by Charles H. Boney, Sr. and Janet K. Seapker. Additional information on notable Boney projects is welcomed.

Author: Leslie N. Boney, Jr. Contributing authors: Charles H. Boney, Sr. and Janet K. Seapker. Editor: Catherine W. Bishir.

Published 2012

Building List

Borden Building (Goldsboro, Wayne County)

Wayne Goldsboro

1914

Contributors:
Dates: 1914-1915
Location: Goldsboro, Wayne County
Street Address: 100 S. James St., Goldsboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The Borden Building, at six stories a skyscraper in its day, was described as Rose's work in his interview with the Goldsboro News-Argus, March 1, 1951.

Tileston School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1872

Contributors:
Dates: 1872; 1910 [expanded]; 1937 [expanded]
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 400 Ann St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984).
Note:

This is the "enlarge high school" project noted for Leitner in the Manufacturers' Record of June 30, 1910. It was an addition to the original building of 1871-1872. Boney planned the third addition to Tileston School, the Ann Street wings; it was estimated to cost $26,000.

Columbus County Hospital (Whiteville, Columbus County)

Columbus Whiteville

1939

Variant Name(s):
  • Columbus County Social Services Offices
Contributors:
Dates: 1939
Location: Whiteville, Columbus County
Street Address: SE corner N. Thompson St. and Jefferson St., Whiteville, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Health Care
Note:

The facility accommodated 60 beds and was paid for with $100,000 loan and grant from PWA.

Waccamaw Bank and Trust Company (Whiteville, Columbus County)

Columbus Whiteville

1935

Contributors:
Dates: 1935
Location: Whiteville, Columbus County
Street Address: Corner of Madison Ave. and Railroad St., Whiteville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

Renovated by the firm, Charles N. Boney, designer, ca. 1999.

Ghent Elementary School (New Bern, Craven County)

Craven New Bern

1922

Variant Name(s):
  • Eleanor Marshall School
Contributors:
Dates: 1922
Location: New Bern, Craven County
Street Address: SW corner of Rhems Ave. and 1st St., New Bern, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The school was credited as being the first "fire resistant" school in eastern North Carolina. It was identical to Riverside Elementary School. The building was demolished ca. 1982.

Riverside Elementary School (New Bern, Craven County)

Craven New Bern

1922

Contributors:
Dates: 1922
Location: New Bern, Craven County
Street Address: 1217 N. Pasteur St., New Bern, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Peter B. Sandbeck, The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina (1988).
Note:

The school was credited as being the first "fire resistant" school in eastern North Carolina. It was identical to Ghent Elementary School, which was demolished ca. 1982.

William C. Lee Field House (Fayetteville, Cumberland County)

Cumberland Fayetteville

1965

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1965
Location: Fayetteville, Cumberland County
Street Address: Fort Bragg, Fayetteville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Recreational

Chinquapin School (Chinquapin, Duplin County)

Duplin Chinquapin

1925

Contributors:
Dates: 1925
Location: Chinquapin, Duplin County
Street Address: NC 41, Chinquapin, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Jennifer F. Martin, Along the Banks of the Old Northeast: the Historical and Architectural Development of Duplin County, North Carolina (1999).
Note:

The school, a typical example of Boney's style, was scheduled for replacement in the 1990s and was demolished ca. 2009.

Duplin General Hospital (Kenansville, Duplin County)

Duplin Kenansville

1952

Contributors:
Dates: 1952
Location: Kenansville, Duplin County
Street Address: Kenansville, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Health Care

Kenansville High School (Kenansville, Duplin County)

Duplin Kenansville

1925

Contributors:
Dates: 1925
Location: Kenansville, Duplin County
Street Address: Main St., Kenansville, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Educational

B. F. Grady School (Kornegay, Duplin County)

Duplin Kornegay

1928

Contributors:
Dates: 1928
Location: Kornegay, Duplin County
Street Address: NC 11, Kornegay vicinity, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Jennifer F. Martin, Along the Banks of the Old Northeast: the Historical and Architectural Development of Duplin County, North Carolina (1999).
Note:

The imposing neoclassical brick school was a landmark of the county for many years. It was built in 1927-1928 and received additions in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. It was razed in the 1990s.

Bank of Wallace (Wallace, Duplin County)

Duplin Wallace

1906

Contributors:
Dates: 1906-1909
Location: Wallace, Duplin County
Street Address: Wallace, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

Boney was working as assistant cashier of the Bank of Wallace and its successor, the Consolidated Bank of Duplin at the time he designed the bank. He also designed the Bank of Pender in Burgaw; the Bank of Onslow in Jacksonville; and the Bank of Rose Hill in Rose Hill.

Leslie N. Boney House (Wallace, Duplin County)

Duplin Wallace

1920

Contributors:
Dates: 1920
Location: Wallace, Duplin County
Street Address: Graham St., Wallace, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Residential

Wallace Presbyterian Church (Wallace, Duplin County)

Duplin Wallace

1908

Contributors:
Dates: 1908-1909
Location: Wallace, Duplin County
Street Address: 104-108 W. Main St., Wallace, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Jennifer F. Martin, Along the Banks of the Old Northeast: the Historical and Architectural Development of Duplin County, North Carolina (1999).
Note:

Additions were made ca. 1936 and 2009, the latter by the firm. The Gothic Revival style brick church is one of several buildings Boney designed in Wallace.

Bland House (Wallace, Duplin County)

Duplin Wallace

1936

Contributors:
Dates: 1936
Location: Wallace, Duplin County
Street Address: East Main St., Wallace, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Paisley Boney Building (Wallace, Duplin County)

Duplin Wallace

1922

Contributors:
Dates: 1922
Location: Wallace, Duplin County
Street Address: 104-108 West Main St., Wallace, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Jennifer F. Martin, Along the Banks of the Old Northeast: the Historical and Architectural Development of Duplin County, North Carolina (1999).

Dr. Deane Hundley, Jr. House (Wallace, Duplin County)

Duplin Wallace

1938

Contributors:
Dates: 1938
Location: Wallace, Duplin County
Street Address: East Main St., Wallace, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Hoke County High School (Raeford, Hoke County)

Hoke Raeford

1934

Contributors:
Dates: 1934
Location: Raeford, Hoke County
Street Address: Main St., Raeford, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Contentnea School (Graingers, Lenoir County)

Lenoir Graingers

1923

Contributors:
Dates: 1923-1924
Location: Graingers, Lenoir County
Street Address: Graingers Station Rd., Graingers, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • M. Ruth Little, Coastal Plain and Fancy: The Historic Architecture of Lenoir County and Kinston, North Carolina (1998).
Note:

Enlarged several times, the main building has the Boney signature 2-story central pedimented portico supported by fluted columns with Corinthian capitals. It is no longer used as a school.

Grainger High School (Kinston, Lenoir County)

Lenoir Kinston

1926

Contributors:
Dates: 1926
Location: Kinston, Lenoir County
Street Address: 300 Park Ave., Kinston, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • M. Ruth Little, Coastal Plain and Fancy: The Historic Architecture of Lenoir County and Kinston, North Carolina (1998).
Note:

A landmark in Kinston, the monumental brick high school was the premier high school in the county. Built at an estimated cost of $250,000, it contained 29 classrooms, an auditorium, gymnasium and cafeteria.

Grainger High School

LaGrange Elementary School (La Grange, Lenoir County)

Lenoir La Grange

1928

Variant Name(s):
  • Kinsey Building
Contributors:
Dates: 1928
Location: La Grange, Lenoir County
Street Address: 402 W. Railroad St., LaGrange, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • M. Ruth Little, Coastal Plain and Fancy: The Historic Architecture of Lenoir County and Kinston, North Carolina (1998).
Note:

Known in recent years as the Kinsey Building, it was razed ca. 2007. Its 2008 successor on the site was designed by LS3P (Boney) architects.

Carolina Beach Hotel (Carolina Beach, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Carolina Beach

1925

Contributors:
Dates: 1925-1926
Location: Carolina Beach, New Hanover County
Street Address: Bounded by 5th Ave., 4th St., and Atlanta St., Carolina Beach, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

A frame building with a bath connecting with almost every room, the 100-room hotel was burned on September 5, 1927. The owners, H. T. Ireland and Mr. Byrd of Greensboro, were indicted for arson.

L.E. Hall House (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1921

Contributors:
Dates: 1921
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 109 N. 15th St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Marion James House (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1921

Contributors:
Dates: 1921
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 1914 Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

J. Douglas Taylor House (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1921

Contributors:
Dates: 1921
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 620 Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

St. Andrew's on the Sound Episcopal Church (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1924

Contributors:
  • American Seating Co., pews and choir table;
  • Leslie N. Boney, Sr., architect;
  • U. A. Underwood, contractor
Dates: 1924
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 101 Airlie Rd., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

The brick Spanish mission style church and its furnishings cost approximately $20,000. The firm added two bays ca. 1995.

Leslie N. Boney House (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1925

Contributors:
Dates: 1925
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 425 S. 3rd St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

New Brooklyn Homes (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1939

Variant Name(s):
  • Taylor Homes
Contributors:
Dates: 1939
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Bounded by N. 4th St., Nixon St., N. 6th St. and Seaboard Air Line Railroad right-of-way, Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

Built as New Brooklyn Homes, the first public housing project in the state, the complex consisted of 246 family units. It was renamed Taylor Homes in 1943 for the Wilmington born architect, Robert R. Taylor, the first black man to graduate from MIT in Architecture and whose principal body of work can be seem on the Tuskegee College campus. The project was demolished ca. 2008.

Ford Auto Company (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1916

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1916
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 5-11 N. 3rd St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial

Oleander Court Apartments (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1940

Contributors:
Dates: 1940-1941
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 3300 Oleander Dr., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

Boney was also part owner of the 92 unit, garden type apartments. They were converted to condominiums ca. 1995.

Wrightsboro Elementary School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1924

Contributors:
Dates: 1924
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 2716 Castle Hayne Rd., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The original 1-story brick building, constructed to consolidate Acorn Branch, Castle Hayne and Wrightsboro Schools, was expanded in 1927. A second story was added in 1939 and a cafeteria was built in 1953. Additional classrooms were built in 1963, 1968 and 1997. The design for the 2008 renovation was by Oakley-Collier of Rocky Mount, NC.

Lake Forest Elementary School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1942

Contributors:
Dates: 1942
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 1806 S. 16th St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

This was part of a second phase of a school expansion program funded by Defense Public Works Division.

Forest Hills Elementary School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1942

Contributors:
Dates: 1942 (second floor addition)
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 602 Colonial Dr., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

This was part of a second phase of a school expansion program funded by Defense Public Works Division.

Sunset Park Elementary School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1942

Contributors:
Dates: 1942
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 613 Alabama Ave., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

This was part of a second phase of a school expansion program funded by Defense Public Works Division.

Peschau House (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1931

Contributors:
Dates: 1931
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Masonboro Sound Rd., Wilmington, NC
Status: Unknown
Type:
  • Residential
Images Published In:
  • Edward F. Turberg, ed., Historic Architecture of New Hanover County, North Carolina (1986).

St. Luke A. M. E. Zion Church (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1944

Contributors:
Dates: 1944
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 419 S 7th St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • William M. Reaves and Beverly Tetterton, "Strength Through Struggle": The Chronological and Historical Record of the African-American Community in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1865-1900 (1998).
Note:

The War Production Board awarded the project priority status, a measure necessary to receive construction materials during the shortages of World War II.

New Hanover County High School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1919

Contributors:
Dates: 1919-1922
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 1307 Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984).

New Hanover County High School

New Hanover County High School Gymnasium (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1939

Contributors:
Dates: 1939-1940
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Behind 1307 Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Trinity Methodist Church (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1920

Contributors:
Dates: 1920-1921
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 1403 Market St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Walter H. Conser, Jr., Sacred Spaces, Architecture and Religion in Historic Wilmington (1999).

New Hanover County Courthouse Annex (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1924

Contributors:
Dates: 1924-1925
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 319 Princess St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984).
Note:

The 64 by 118-foot four-story addition was estimated to cost $150,000. Actually a separate building linked to the courthouse by a hyphen, it displays a restrained neoclassicism in pale stone, which contrasts with the robust eclectic style of the red brick courthouse designed by A. S. Eichberg. The portico and pilasters display the Tower of the Winds capitals popular in Wilmington and favored by Boney.

Williston Industrial High School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1937

Contributors:
Dates: 1937-1938
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: S. 10th between Ann St. and Nun St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

This Williston High School replaced a 1930 building (the third Williston) by Wilmington architects Lynch and Foard that burned in 1936.

USO Building (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1943

Contributors:
Dates: 1943 (enlargement)
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: Corner of 2nd St. and Orange St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Military
Note:

The firm accomplished site planning for prototype building.

Mt. Zion A. M. E. Church (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1944

Contributors:
Dates: 1944-1946
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 1111 N. Fifth St., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Images Published In:
  • Walter H. Conser, Jr., Sacred Spaces, Architecture and Religion in Historic Wilmington (1999).
  • William M. Reaves and Beverly Tetterton, "Strength Through Struggle": The Chronological and Historical Record of the African-American Community in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1865-1900 (1998).
Note:

After the city of Wilmington condemned the old church on the site in 1944, a replacement building was essential. The War Production Board awarded the project priority status, a measure necessary for it to receive construction materials during the shortages of WWII.

Wilmington College Campus (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1960

Variant Name(s):
  • Hoggard Hall;
  • Hinton James Hall;
  • University of North Carolina at Wilmington Campus;
  • Alderman Hall
Contributors:
  • Anderson Construction, builders;
  • Ballard and McKim, supervising architects;
  • Leslie N. Boney, Sr., architect
Dates: 1960-1963
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 600 South College Rd., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

Using his favorite Neoclassical Revival style executed in red brick, with slate roofs and Tower of the Winds column capitals, Boney established the look that other architects of subsequent campus buildings followed. The Tower of the Winds order had been popular in Wilmington since the antebellum period (see John Norris and James F. Post).

Cape Fear Country Club (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1920

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1920
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 1518 Country Club Rd., Wilmington, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Recreational
Images Published In:
  • Susan Taylor Block, Cape Fear Lost (1999).

Chestnut Street School (Wilmington, New Hanover County)

New Hanover Wilmington

1942

Variant Name(s):
  • Snipes Elementary School
Contributors:
Dates: 1942-1943
Location: Wilmington, New Hanover County
Street Address: 2150 Chestnut St., Wilmington, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The building was demolished in 2009.

Camp LeJeune Marine Corps Base (Jacksonville, Onslow County)

Onslow Jacksonville

1939

Contributors:
Dates: 1939-1940 (survey); 1941
Location: Jacksonville, Onslow County
Street Address: Camp LeJeune Marine Corps Base, Jacksonville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Military
Images Published In:
  • J. Daniel Pezzoni, The Architectural History of Onslow County (1998).

Dee's Drug Store (Burgaw, Pender County)

Pender Burgaw

1937

Variant Name(s):
  • Dees Drug Store
Contributors:
Dates: 1937
Location: Burgaw, Pender County
Street Address: 111 South Wright St., Burgaw, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The drugstore is a beloved local institution near the town center.

Perquimans High School (Hertford, Perquimans County)

Perquimans Hertford

1923

Contributors:
Dates: 1923-1924
Location: Hertford, Perquimans County
Street Address: 411 Edenton Rd. St., Hertford, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The three-story school was designed to contain twenty classrooms and an auditorium. It still serves as part of the much enlarged high school.

Ayden High School (Ayden, Pitt County)

Pitt Ayden

1929

Variant Name(s):
  • Old Ayden High School
Contributors:
Dates: 1929
Location: Ayden, Pitt County
Street Address: 4354 Lee St., Ayden, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational
Images Published In:
  • Scott Power, The Historical Architecture of Pitt County, North Carolina (1991).
Note:

The school was renovated by Leslie N. Boney, Architects in 1980. As of 2011 it served as headquarters of the local arts and recreation department.

Sheppard Memorial Library (Greenville, Pitt County)

Pitt Greenville

1930

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1930
Location: Greenville, Pitt County
Street Address: 530 Evans St., Greenville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Public

The Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of North Carolina (Raleigh, Wake County)

Wake Raleigh

1955

Contributors:
Dates: 1955 (plans)
Location: Raleigh, Wake County
Street Address: 2921 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Fraternal

The Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of North Carolina

Bragaw Dormitory (Raleigh, Wake County)

Wake Raleigh

1955

Contributors:
Dates: 1955-1959
Location: Raleigh, Wake County
Street Address: NCSU Campus, Raleigh, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Educational

Wake Forest High School (Wake Forest, Wake County)

Wake Wake Forest

1927

Variant Name(s):
  • Wake Forest Elementary School
Contributors:
Dates: 1927
Location: Wake Forest, Wake County
Street Address: S. Main St., Wake Forest, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Educational
Note:

The red brick Wake Forest High School built in the 1920s was complemented by a classroom building planned by William H. Deitrick in the 1930s. Boney's 1920s building was razed in 1991.

Leslie N. Boney, Sr.'s Work Locations

Bibliography

  • The Agromeck, North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Mechanics Arts (1903).
  • Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Eastern North Carolina (1996).
  • Leslie N. Boney Architectural Papers, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, North Carolina.
  • Walter H. Conser, Jr., Sacred Spaces, Architecture and Religion in Historic Wilmington (1999).
  • J. Marshall Crews, From These Beginnings (1984).
  • Barbara Hammond, An Architectural Inventory of Goldsboro, NC (1987).
  • C. David Jackson and Charlotte V. Brown, History of the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, 1913-1998 (1998).
  • Virginia Whiting Kuhn, Tide and Time: A History of Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina (2008).
  • M. Ruth Little, The Town and Gown Architecture of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1795-1975 (2006).
  • M. Ruth Little, Coastal Plain and Fancy: The Historic Architecture of Lenoir County and Kinston, North Carolina (1998).
  • Jennifer F. Martin, Along the Banks of the Old Northeast: the Historical and Architectural Development of Duplin County, North Carolina (1999).
  • J. Daniel Pezzoni, The Architectural History of Onslow County (1998).
  • J. Daniel Pezzoni and Penne Smith, Glimpses of Wayne County, North Carolina: An Architectural History (1998).
  • Scott Power, The Historical Architecture of Pitt County, North Carolina (1991).
  • William Reaves Files, New Hanover County Public Library, Wilmington, North Carolina.
  • William M. Reaves and Beverly Tetterton, "Strength Through Struggle": The Chronological and Historical Record of the African-American Community in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1865-1900 (1998).
  • Peter B. Sandbeck, The Historic Architecture of New Bern and Craven County, North Carolina (1988).
  • Southern Architect (June, 1955).
  • Robert B. Toplin, ed., A History of B'Nai Israel Congregation (1984).
  • Emily Weil, Temple Oheb Sholom (2000).
  • Wilmington City Directories, 1919-2010.
  • Tony P. Wrenn, Wilmington, North Carolina: An Architectural and Historical Portrait (1984).
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