North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Lazenby Brothers (ca. 1890-ca. 1902)

Founded: Statesville, North Carolina, USA
Headquarters:
  • Statesville, North Carolina
Trades:
  • Contractor
NC Work Locations:
  • Statesville, Iredell County
  • Iredell
  • Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
  • Mecklenburg
Building Types:
  • Health Care;
  • Public;
  • Religious
Styles & Forms:
  • Chateau Style;
  • Colonial Revival;
  • Romanesque Revival

Hambley-Wallace House [Salisbury]

View larger image and credits

Hambley-Wallace House [Salisbury]

Biography

For a building list and more details, see Alfred Lazenby.

Author: Catherine W. Bishir.

Published 2016

Building List

Carnegie Library (Charlotte, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Charlotte

1901

Variant Name(s):
  • Charlotte Public Library
Contributors:
Dates: 1901-1903
Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: 310 N. Tryon St., Charlotte, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Public
Images Published In:
  • Mary Norton Kratt and Mary Manning Boyer, Remembering Charlotte: Postcards from a New South City, 1905-1950 (2000).
Note:

A notice carried in the Roxboro Courier of November 6, 1901, reported that Lazenby Brothers of Statesville had the contract to build the $25,000 Carnegie library. It was to be "of the French renaissance style." The Manufacturers' Record of November 7, 1901, noted that "Lazenby Brothers of Statesville" had received a $25,000 contract to erect a proposed Carnegie Library in Charlotte, a prominent edifice designed by Wheeler, McMichael, and Company (the short-lived partnership of Oliver Wheeler and James M. McMichael). The accompanying postcard image shows the library on the right, and First Baptist Church on the left.

Carnegie Library

Billingsley Hospital (Statesville, Iredell County)

Iredell Statesville

1899

Contributors:
Dates: 1899-1900
Location: Statesville, Iredell County
Street Address: Park St., Statesville, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Health Care
Note:

The Statesville Record and Landmark of August 13, 1959, carried a historical account by Homer Keever about the Billingsley Hospital, a bequest to the city from a minister named Amos S. Billingsley. Hook and Sawyer were employed as the architects, and the contract went to the Lazenby Brothers. It served for many years and was eventually razed.

Key Memorial Chapel (Statesville, Iredell County)

Iredell Statesville

1898

Variant Name(s):
  • St. Philip's Catholic Church
Contributors:
Dates: 1898
Location: Statesville, Iredell County
Street Address: 156 E. Sharpe St., Statesville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

The small brick church in Gothic Revival style features a crenellated corner tower. It was built in memory of a Philip Barton Key (a grand nephew of Francis Scott Key), who became a businessman in Statesville after the Civil War.

Tenth Avenue Presbyterian Church (Charlotte, Mecklenburg County)

Mecklenburg Charlotte

1902

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1902
Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg County
Street Address: Tenth Ave., Charlotte, NC
Status: No longer standing
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

The Manufacturer's Record of November 14, 1901, said that Lazenby Brothers of Statesville had a contract to build a proposed Graham Street Presbyterian Church in Charlotte after plans by Hook and Sawyer. A year later, an article in the Charlotte News of November 8, 1902, explained that the congregation had decided to build at a new location at the corner of 10th and Pine Streets and to rename the church Tenth Avenue Presbyterian Church. The newspaper printed a drawing of the Gothic Revival church. After that church burned, the congregation moved to another site and became Third Presbyterian Church, which is still active.

Lazenby Brothers's Work Locations

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