Sayre and Baldwin (1909-1915)

Founded:

South Carolina, USA

Residences:

  • Anderson, South Carolina
  • Raleigh, North Carolina

Trades:

  • Architect

Styles & Forms:

Beaux-Arts; Colonial Revival

The architectural partnership of Sayre and Baldwin (1909-1915) was established in 1909 in Anderson, South Carolina, by Christopher Gadsden Sayre (1876-1933) and James J. Baldwin (1888-1955). In 1914 the firm opened a branch office in Raleigh. In 1915 the two men dissolved the partnership and entered on prolific independent practices. Although a substantial portion of their work was in South Carolina, the firm planned numerous projects in North Carolina between 1909 and 1915. Many of the firm’s North Carolina projects, as cited in the Manufacturers’ Record, were located in southern Piedmont and western counties relatively close to Anderson, South Carolina.

When they formed their partnership, both men were in the early stages of highly productive careers. Both men’s best known works are from their subsequent individual practices, chiefly from the 1920s, but their partnership was important in establishing their practices. Working during a period of new statewide construction of educational and health facilities, Sayre and Baldwin specialized in those building types, which were the “bread and butter” for many architects. Sayre, especially, was an important school architect throughout his prolific career.

Several projects by Sayre and Baldwin were cited in the Manufacturers’ Record, chiefly when the firm had proposed or completed plans for the buildings. Some were identified by name and location: Anson County, Wadesboro, Anderson Sanitarium Building (MR 6/19/1913); Cabarrus County, Mount Pleasant, Mont Amoena Seminary Building (MR 7/18/1912); Gaston County, Gastonia, Mrs. E. C. Wilson House, “colonial style dwelling” (MR 12/30/09); Johnston County, Smithfield, Bank of Smithfield (MR 5/22/1913, 6/19/1913); Johnston County, Smithfield, Cotter-Underwood Store Building (MR 5/22/1913 and 6/19/1913); Lee County, Sanford, First Methodist Church (MR 6/6/1914); Randolph County, Asheboro, Randolph County Jail (MR 8/13/1914); Rutherford County, Rutherfordton, Dr. Henry Morris Hospital (MR 9/15/1910); Transylvania County, Brevard, Brevard Institute Girls’ Dormitory Remodeling (MR 12/4/1913). Others were noted only by type and location: School, Concord, Cabarrus County (MR 7/9/1914); School, Bessemer City, Gaston County (MR 7/24/1913); School, Canton, Haywood County (MR 4/15/1909); Graded School, Kenly, Johnston County (MR 6/19/1913); School, Franklin, Macon County (MR 6/24/1909); School, Rutherfordton, Rutherford County (MR 6/30/1910); School, Marshville, Union County (MR 9/9/1909, 12/2/1909). It should be noted that not all projects cited in the Manufacturers’ Record as planned by a firm were actually built. Further research may confirm construction and locations for these and other works. Only confirmed buildings are included in the building list.

  • John E. Wells and Robert E. Dalton, The South Carolina Architects, 1885-1935: A Biographical Dictionary (1992).
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  • Mrs. E. C. Wilson House

    Contributors:
    James J. Baldwin, architect; Sayre and Baldwin, architect; Christopher Gadsden Sayre, architects
    Dates:
    1909-1910
    Location:
    Gastonia, Gaston County
    Street Address:
    Gastonia, NC
    Status:
    No longer standing
    Type:
    Residential
    Note:
    The Mrs. E. C. Wilson House, a "colonial style dwelling," was cited as Sayre's and Baldwin's in the Manufacturers' Record (Dec. 30, 1909).

  • Patton Memorial Hospital

    Contributors:
    James J. Baldwin, architect; Sayre and Baldwin, architects; Christopher Gadsden Sayre, architect
    Dates:
    1912-1913
    Location:
    Hendersonville, Henderson County
    Street Address:
    1225 Highland St., Hendersonville, NC
    Status:
    Standing
    Type:
    Health Care
    Note:
    The Patton Hospital was cited as Sayre and Baldwin's in the Manufacturers' Record (10/24/1912, 3/27/1913, and 4/3/1913). The 2-story brick building with Craftsman detailing was the mountain resort's first hospital and encouraged the development of the suburb known as Hyman Heights.

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