North Carolina Architects and Builders - A Biographical Dictionary

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Holleyman, William C. (1893-1939)

Variant Name(s):
  • William C. Holeyman;
  • William C. Holleyman, Jr.;
  • W. C. Holleyman
Birthplace: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Residences:
  • Greensboro, North Carolina
Trades:
  • Architect
NC Work Locations:
  • Fayetteville, Cumberland County
  • Cumberland
  • Greensboro, Guilford County
  • Guilford
  • High Point, Guilford County
  • Guilford
  • Pinehurst, Moore County
  • Moore
  • Asheboro, Randolph County
  • Randolph
Building Types:
  • Commercial;
  • Educational;
  • Residential
Styles & Forms:
  • Colonial Revival;
  • Georgian Revival

Commercial National Bank [High Point]

View larger image and credits

Commercial National Bank [High Point]

Biography

William Crumley (W. C.) Holleyman, Jr. (September 12, 1893-January 13, 1939), a native of Atlanta, Georgia, was an architect active in Greensboro in the early 20th century and was best known for his residential work, including fine houses built during the 1930s.

A son of W. C. Holleyman, Sr., a merchant, and Esther Holleyman, W. C. graduated in architecture from Georgia Tech in 1917. He registered for military service in August 1917 and in 1918 was promoted to the rank of captain (Atlanta Constitution, April 3, 1918). Honorably discharged in September 1919, he went to New York, where the Atlanta Constitution of December 28, 1919, reported that his parents were spending the holidays with him.

According to his obituary, Holleyman practiced architecture in New York for two years before going to Greensboro in 1921. He evidently formed an acquaintance in the metropolis with New York architect Charles C. Hartmann, an associate of hotel architect William Lee Stoddart.

In the late 1910s, Hartmann had begun to visit North Carolina to supervise two Stoddart hotel commissions for which he was chief designer—the Sheraton in High Point and the O. Henry in Greensboro. Hartmann impressed Greensboro leaders, and in 1921 Julian Price, vice-president of Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company, invited Hartmann to come to Greensboro, promising him the commission for the company's $2.5 million headquarters building, provided that Hartmann open a permanent practice in the city. Hartmann's successful and prolific office in Greensboro operated from 1921 until his retirement in 1966.

The Greensboro Daily News of September 14, 1921 noted Hartmann's commission to design the 10-story Commercial National Bank in High Point and reported that "W. C. Holleyman, Jr., Mr. Hartmann's associate in Greensboro" stated that Hartmann and the bank officers had gone to New York to inspect banking rooms there. The article also identified Hartmann as architect of the 17-story Jefferson Standard Building, upon which construction would not begin in 1922.

In 1921 Holleyman was listed in the city directory as working with Hartmann. In 1923, Holleyman married Frederica Genevieve Bremer of Philadelphia in that city (Atlanta Constitution, January 28, 1923). Holleyman continued his association with Hartmann, as indicated by Greensboro city directories of 1923-1928. Although it is likely that Holleyman worked with Hartmann on the Jefferson Standard Building, it is not yet known how the two architects divided up their work or what role Holleyman had in projects credited to Hartmann.

In the late 1920s Holleyman established his own practice: directories of 1929, 1930, and 1934 show his architectural office in a building at 100 N. Elm Street, next door to Hartmann who was at 101 N. Elm Street. Notably, these two buildings held the offices of seven of Greensboro's nine architects listed in the 1930 directory; two others were elsewhere on Elm Street. By 1938 Holleyman had moved his office to 114 N. Elm, while Hartmann stayed at 100.

During the Great Depression, Holleyman continued to gain commissions in Greensboro and other North Carolina communities, making connections with still-prosperous clients in a time when many architects experienced difficulty in finding work. These included handsome residences in various revivalist styles in Fayetteville, Asheboro, and especially the resort village of Pinehurst in Moore County, where he designed several notable buildings.

Notable among Holleyman's known works in Greensboro is the eclectic Norman Revival style Herman Cone House (1935-1936) for the oldest son of textile magnate Ceasar Cone. It is one of numerous grand residences in the prestigious Irving Park suburb, where Holleyman may have designed other residences. Holleyman also designed the Science Building at present UNC-Greensboro, employing a red brick Colonial Revival campus style already established there by Greensboro architect Harry Barton. The Greensboro Daily News of October 12, 1938 illustrated its account of the Science Building with Holleyman's perspective drawing, which survives at the UNCG Libraries (see (http://library.uncg.edu/dp/ttt/index.aspx?verb=20&start=226). By the time the building opened in 1940, its architect had died: the Burlington, N. C. Daily Times of January 14, 1939, reported that Holleyman had died on January 13 of a heart attack at age 45, which cut short a career in mid-course.

Author: Catherine W. Bishir.

Published 2018

Building List

Commercial National Bank (High Point, Guilford County)

Guilford High Point

1921

Contributors:
Dates: 1921-1924
Location: High Point, Guilford County
Street Address: 164 S. Main St., High Point, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Images Published In:
  • Benjamin Briggs, The Architecture of High Point, North Carolina: A History and Guide to the City's Houses, Churches and Public Buildings (2008).
  • H. McKelden Smith, Architectural Resources: An Inventory of Historic Architecture, High Point, Jamestown, Gibsonville, Guilford County (1979).
Note:

Architect Holleyman was associated with Hartmann during the latter's commission for this project, High Point's premier early 20th century skyscraper.

Commercial National Bank

First Presbyterian Church (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1892

Contributors:
Dates: 1892; 1938 (renovation as museum, joining of two buildings)
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 220 N. Church St., Greensboro, NC
Status: Altered
Type:
  • Religious
Note:

The Brooklyn firm of L. B. Valk and Son designed the third sanctuary of Greensboro's First Presbyterian Church in the robust Romanesque Revival style popular at the time. When Charlotte architect C. C. Hook planned the adjoining Smith Memorial Building of 1903, he continued in a similar style. The congregation later erected its present building in the Fisher Park suburb (see Harry Barton and Hobart Upjohn), and this facility was converted to civic use.

Dr. William C. Verdery House (Fayetteville, Cumberland County)

Cumberland Fayetteville

1936

Contributors:
Dates: 1936
Location: Fayetteville, Cumberland County
Street Address: 1428 Raeford Rd., Fayetteville, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

The large brick house exhibits Holleyman's favored Colonial Revival style with bold classical details.

Herman Cone House (Greensboro, Guilford County)

Guilford Greensboro

1935

Contributors:
Dates: 1935-1936
Location: Greensboro, Guilford County
Street Address: 806 Country Club Dr., Greensboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential

Lansmyr (Pinehurst, Moore County)

Moore Pinehurst

1934

Contributors:
Dates: 1934
Location: Pinehurst, Moore County
Street Address: 175 Linden Rd., Pinehurst, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

Clients in the planned resort village of Pinehurst, who hailed from many distant communities, commissioned houses from a variety of architects from North Carolina and from northern cities. The Colonial Revival house Holleyman designed for Lansing B. Warner of Chicago was reportedly the first "substantial winter home" built there during the Depression.

Village Court (Pinehurst, Moore County)

Moore Pinehurst

1930

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1930
Location: Pinehurst, Moore County
Street Address: 40-48 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

Holleyman employed his favored Colonial Revival style in creative fashion to produce a block of one and two-story stores that combines unity and variety.

Merrow Building/Razook's (Pinehurst, Moore County)

Moore Pinehurst

1934

Contributors:
Dates: 1934
Location: Pinehurst, Moore County
Street Address: 35 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

Holleyman remodeled an existing frame building by covering it in brick and adding Colonial Revival details to harmonize with other village architecture.

Sunset Theatre (Asheboro, Randolph County)

Randolph Asheboro

1928

Contributors:
Dates: 1928-1930
Location: Asheboro, Randolph County
Street Address: 234 Sunset Ave., Asheboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Commercial
Note:

The website http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/16395 credits the theatre to Holleyman.

J. Frank McCrary House (Asheboro, Randolph County)

Randolph Asheboro

1933

Contributors:
Dates: Ca. 1933
Location: Asheboro, Randolph County
Street Address: 232 Worth St., Asheboro, NC
Status: Standing
Type:
  • Residential
Note:

The Tudor Revival residence was built for a son of Asheboro and North Carolina textile leader D. B. McCrary, who founded the Acme-McCrary Company. According to a historic designation report of 2010, Holleyman's plans for the house survive at the Acme-McCrary Corporation. See https://www.noexperiencenecessarybook.com/93vqB/designation-report-j-frank-mccrary-house-doc.html.

William Holleyman's Work Locations

Bibliography

  • Benjamin Briggs, The Architecture of High Point, North Carolina: A History and Guide to the City's Houses, Churches and Public Buildings (2008).
  • Marvin A. Brown, Greensboro: An Architectural Record (1995).

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