Carr, George Watts, Sr. (1893-1975)

Birthplace:

Durham, NC

Trades:

  • Architect

Styles & Forms:

Art Deco; Tudor Revival; Georgian Revival

George Watts Carr, Sr. (April 13, 1893-July 17, 1975), often known as Watts Carr, was among Durham’s most prolific and prestigious architects in the early and mid-20th century. Like many architects of his generation, Carr was at home with all of the popular period styles and most building types; he was especially known for his handsome residences in revivalist styles. This entry is based primarily on “George Watts Carr,” Open Durham, posted at www.opendurham.org/people/carr-george-watts-sr by Preservation Durham, and Roberts (Brown) et al., Durham.

George Watts Carr entered the architectural profession through a somewhat circuitous route. He was a son of Louis Albert Carr (1852-1909) and Clara Louise Watts Carr (1857-1898), natives of Maryland who moved to Durham in about 1888. Their move followed that of Clara’s brother, George Washington Watts (for whom George Watts Carr was named). George Washington Watts had moved to Durham after his father provided funds that enabled him to become a 20 percent shareholder in the Duke family’s tobacco business at a critical time in the firm’s development. George Washington Watts, like the Dukes and other Durham business leaders, amassed a fortune and became a major philanthropist. The Carr and Watts families built houses next door to each other in the prestigious Morehead Hill neighborhood. They and their extensive web of relatives thrived in the booming town’s economic, civic, and social life, and news of their activities appeared frequently in local newspapers. Along with his architectural skills, George Watts Carr’s personal and family connections strengthened his success as an architect in a world in which he was very much at home socially as well as professionally.

George Watts Carr attended Davidson College. In 1916 he married Amy Winston (1894-1959), a daughter of noted attorney and judge, R. W. Winston; their wedding at Christ Church in Raleigh was cited in a Winston-Salem newspaper as being “of state-wide interest to society.” Their children included George Watts Carr, Jr. and Robert W. Carr.

Durham city directories outline George Watts Carr’s career trajectory. For a time, he engaged in the shoe business; the Durham city directory of 1921 listed him as president and treasurer of the Carr-Bryant Shoe Company; the 1923 edition listed no occupation for him. In 1925, however, he was listed a manager with architects Northup and O’Brien and a resident of Forest Hills; and in 1926 he appeared as an architect associated with W. R. Northup of Northup and O’Brien. In 1928 and 1929 Carr continued to be listed with Northup and O’Brien as an architect, vice-president of the associated New Hope Realty Company, and manager for Northup and O’Brien. In 1932 he was identified as a representative of Northup and O’Brien.

Northup and O’Brien was a leading architectural firm in the tobacco and textile manufacturing city of Winston-Salem. In about 1923 (as related by Ruth Little in the Forest Hills Historic District National Register of Historic Places nomination), the firm had decided to expand their practice in Durham “to lay out houses, a clubhouse, and other facilities for Forest Hills,” a prestigious golf club suburb being developed by businessman James O. Cobb. It was probably at Cobb’s suggestion that Northup and O’Brien hired George Watts Carr to manage the local office. Cobb and Carr had been friends since attending Davidson College together. Carr soon became the chief architect for Forest Hills.

Explaining George Watts Carr’s transition from merchant to architect, his son, Robert W. Carr, recalled that after George’s partner in the shoe business left it in financial trouble in the early 1920s, George was seeking a new occupation. His wife, recognizing his drawing skills, encouraged him to obtain training in architecture, and he enrolled in a correspondence course in the field. He studied for and passed the state licensing exam in 1926. Even before gaining his architectural license, Carr was designing buildings for the suburb. In planning houses, Carr consulted popular publications and often customized the published designs to suit his clients. Despite his lack of formal architectural training, he succeeded in the profession, readily understanding and satisfying the tastes of his clientele. (Triangle Modernist Homes, interview with Robert and Edgar Carr [2011] at http://www.ncmodernist.org/Carr2011.mp4).

Among Carr’s first projects in Forest Hills was a clubhouse for the golf course, a small frame Colonial style building erected on the east side of University Drive (1923), which was replaced in 1929, also from Carr’s design. Six houses designed by Carr, the first homes built in the new subdivision, were under construction in 1923 and served as models to encourage investment. Durham newspapers of 1925 and later touted the wonders of the “exclusive” new suburb with its golf course and swimming pool.

Carr’s most elaborate Forest Hills commission was Pinecrest, the English manorial style estate built in the mid-1920s for developer James Cobb. Carr designed at least fifteen additional Forest Hills houses, most in the Colonial Revival style. His seven Colonial Revival designs on Oak Drive in Forest Hills feature details that emulate authentic colonial decorative elements. Opendurham’s website lists several houses for which plans were reportedly ordered from New York or the New York Times and modified by Carr. In 1926 and 1927 Carr headed Northup and O’Brien’s Durham office and was primarily responsible for the firm’s projects in the Durham area. When the New Hope Realty Company suffered bankruptcy in 1929, Northup and O’Brien closed their Durham office, and Carr took over the practice. One of Durham’s most elegant commercial buildings, the Snow Building, dates from the transitional era in Carr’s career: a relatively small, richly detailed gem in Art Deco style with hints of the Gothic Revival. Whether it was Carr’s design alone or also reflected work by other members of the firm such as Luther Lashmit is not certain.

Despite the Great Depression, Carr continued to gain commissions. Especially notable was a project that boosted local employment and became an instant landmark of the city: a large, illustrated advertisement in the Charlotte Observer of April 26, 1937, displayed the Art Deco skyscraper then called the Home Bank Building, and featured the name, “George Watts Carr/ Architect.” As a spectacularly tall and modern element in the Durham cityscape, the new bank referenced the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem in its stepped massing and Art Deco detailing. For years it was known as the Hill Building for attorney, banker, and civic leader John Sprunt Hill (whose wife, Annie Louise Watts Hill, was the daughter of George Washington Watts). Most sources credit as architects not only George Watts Carr but also Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, best known as architects of the Empire State Building, who as Shreve and Lamb had designed the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem. See Shreve and Lamb.

George Watts Carr, Sr., and his family regularly appeared in news of social events in local and state newspapers, as for example an account in the Charlotte Observer of December 21, 1931, of Christmas holiday events at the Pinehurst golf resort community. Noted among the North Carolinians present at the opening events at the Mid-Pines Country Club were Mrs. And Mrs. John Sprunt Hill, Mr. and Mrs. George Watts Hill and Mr. and Mrs. George Watts Carr of Durham, and Mrs. William N. Reynolds of Winston-Salem.

In the Forest Hills and Hope Valley suburbs and elsewhere, Carr’s residences were and are highly valued for their excellent design and execution. Architect Archie Royal Davis came to Durham in the 1930s to work for Carr and became a leading practitioner of the Colonial Revival style in the mid-20th century in Durham, Chapel Hill, and Hillsborough. More remains to be written about the firm’s work, especially residential work in various communities.

In addition to residences, as reported in Open Durham, Carr’s firm took commissions for a variety of public projects. His firm developed the capacity to handle military projects, of which the largest was the 2,000-bed Marine Hospital at Camp Lejeune, N.C., a site where his firm was engaged in projects for four years. Along with associate J. E. Greiner of Baltimore, he also designed the Cherry Point Marine Air Base, the North Carolina Ports Authority Terminal at Morehead City, and several buildings at the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis. He was named to the Advisory Panel for planning the United States Capitol and grounds. His firm designed buildings at North Carolina Central University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as public schools in Durham, county hospitals in eastern and central North Carolina, and the Veterans’ Hospital in Durham. Active in the architectural profession, Carr received honor awards from the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, which he served as vice president in 1936-1937 and president in 1938-1939. He had his own practice in Durham until 1961.

George Watts Carr, Sr.’s family continued the tradition he had begun. His son, Robert (“Judge”) W. Carr, associated with the firm and later continued the practice in his own name. George Watts Carr, Sr.’s grandson, Edgar Toms Carr, subsequently became associated with the firm. Although George Watts Carr, Sr., became less active in the business in 1974, he continued as consulting architect with Carr, Harrison, Pruden and DePasquale until his death in 1975. His grave marker at Maplewood Cemetery is inscribed “George Watts Carr, Architect.”

Most of Carr’s extensive architectural records remain in private hands. Large-format photocopies of his architectural drawings of the S. P. Alexander Residence in the Forest Hills neighborhood of Durham, North Carolina, dated 1929, are held by the Special Collections Research Center, NC State University Libraries, Raleigh. The website, “George Watts Carr,”at https:www.opendurham.org/people/carr-george-watts-sr by Preservation Durham, contains a long, illustrated list of Carr’s works, of which only a few examples are included in the building list here. See also http://www.ncmodernist.org/Carr2011.mp4

C. David Jackson and Charlotte V. Brown, History of the North Carolina Chapter (1998)

“George Watts Carr,” Open Durham, posted at www.opendurham.org/people/carr-george-watts-sr by Preservation Durham.

“Home Tour 2015: The Architecture of George Watts Carr,” Preservation Durham, posted December 10, 2004, at https://preservationdurham.org/index.php/home-tour-2015/

Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

M. Ruth Little, The Town and Gown Architecture of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1795-1975 (2006).

M. Ruth Little, Forest Hills Historic District National Register of Historic Places nomination.

Sort Building List by:
  • A. M. Gilbert House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1920s

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    503 Compton Pl.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    “Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).”

    Note:

    Carr designed the Tudor Revival cottage for Duke University professor A. M. Gilbert and his wife to resemble the house in which they had lived in Austria. It features applied half-timbering and authentic mortise and tenon construction framing large casement windows.


  • Alban Widgery House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1931

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    152 Pinecrest Rd.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    Carr designed the 2-story brick house for Duke University philosophy professor Widgery to emulate a typical Cotswold cottage of his native England.


  • Camp LeJeune Marine Corps Base

    Contributors:
    Leslie N. Boney, Sr., architect and surveyor; George Watts Carr, architect; J. E. Greiner Company, general contractors
    Dates:

    1939-1940 (survey); 1941

    Location:
    Jacksonville, Onslow County
    Street Address:

    Camp LeJeune Marine Corps Base, Jacksonville, NC

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Military

    Images Published In:

    J. Daniel Pezzoni, The Architectural History of Onslow County (1998).


  • Carl R. Harris House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1936

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    804 Hermitage Ct.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Note:

    The 2-story frame, academic rendition of the Colonial Revival with hipped roof and flush sheathing beneath a full-height portico recalls Mount Vernon. Carr designed the house for Harris, a vice president of Erwin Mills.


  • Carmichael House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1940

    Location:
    Chapel Hill, Orange County
    Street Address:

    106 Laurel Hill Circle

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    M. Ruth Little, The Town and Gown Architecture of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1795-1975 (2006).

    Note:

    The large red brick Georgian Revival style residence was built for the longtime University of North Carolina comptroller.


  • Couch House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    ca. 1928

    Location:
    Chapel Hill, Orange County
    Street Address:

    3 Ridge Road

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    M. Ruth Little, The Town and Gown Architecture of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1795-1975 (2006).


  • David and Susan Smith House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    ca. 1928

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    3437 Dover Rd.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    All but two of the ten speculative houses Carr designed for the New Hope Realty Co., developers of Hope Valley, are in the Colonial Revival style: the Tudor Revival Brownell House and this Spanish Colonial Revival D. T. Smith House


  • Durham Athletic Park

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1939

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    500 Washington St.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Recreational

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982)

    Note:

    The cylindrical, two-story ticket office with a conical roof is the hallmark of the facility used by the minor league Durham Bulls until 1995, when the team moved to a new ballpark. The ballfield became famous as the setting for the movie Bull Durham (1988). In 2008-2009, the stadium was refurbished to serve a variety of community uses.


  • Ephphatha Church

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1930-1931

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    220 W. Geer St.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Religious

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    Neo-Gothic Revival, gable-front in English bond red brick with stone trim, this was one of four churches built in the country for deaf worshippers. The Ephphatha congregation ceased using the building in 1977.


  • Forest Hills Clubhouse

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1928-1929

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    1639 University Dr.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Recreational

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    The Colonial Revival building designed by Carr to replace the original, ca. 1923 clubhouse, believed also to have been designed by Carr and later burned, was the centerpiece of the 9-hole golf course built to attract buyers to Forest Hills. The flanking 1-story wings connected by hyphens are early additions.


  • George Watts Carr, Sr., House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1925

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    35 Oak Dr.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    Carr, who was responsible for the designs of most of the houses on Oak Dr., designed this 2-story frame Colonial Revival house for himself and his family in his favorite style.


  • Hill Building

    Contributors:
    George Watts Carr, Sr., architect; George Kane, contractor; Shreve, Lamb, and Harmon, architects; Syska and Hennessy, consulting engineer
    Variant Name(s):

    CCB Building

    Dates:

    1935-1937

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    111 Corcoran St., Durham, NC

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Commercial

    Images Published In:

    Catherine W. Bishir and Michael T. Southern, A Guide to the Historic Architecture of Piedmont North Carolina (2003).
    Claudia P. Roberts (Brown) and Diane E. Lea, The Durham Architectural and Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    A distinctive accent in Durham’s skyline, the 17-story skyscraper reiterates in somewhat more conservative form the dramatic ziggurat form and Art Deco details of Shreve and Lamb’s Reynolds Building (1927-1929) in Winston-Salem and Shreve, Lamb, and Harmon’s iconic Empire State Building in New York. It was built for John Sprunt Hill for the Home Savings and Trust Company and provided employment for workers and suppliers in the Great Depression. Although several sources suggest that Shreve, Lamb, and Harmon took a direct role in the project, an advertisement in the Charlotte Observer of April 26, 1937, pictured the skyscraper and cited “ George Watts Carr/Architect” and “Syska and Hennessy, Consulting Engineer.” It later became the Central Carolina Bank and Trust Company, of which John Sprunt Hill’s son, George Watts Hill, Sr. was president. It has been renovated as a fine hotel.


  • Hubert and Mary Teer House

    Contributors:
    George Watts Carr, Sr, architect; George Kane, contractor
    Dates:

    1932

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    2825 Chelsea Cir.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982)

    Note:

    One of the most notable of Carr’s Colonial Revival residential designs, the large house is highlighted by a monumental two-story portico across the five-bay façade of the main block and an elegant neoclassical entrance surmounted by a Palladian window. Hubert Teer was a partner with his brother, Nello, in Nello Teer, Inc., an international paving contracting firm.


  • J. B. Hubbell House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1931

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    121 Pinecrest Rd.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    Like his neighbor, Alban Widgery, Duke University English Professor J. B. Hubbell also desired an English cottage and commissioned Carr to design this large brick house in the Tudor style.


  • J. Bryan Griswold House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    ca. 1930

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    1614 University Dr.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    Considerably altered sometime between 1982 and 2005, Tudor cottage style house is the only positively identified example of the several houses scattered throughout the neighborhood that were built according to stock plans ordered and modified by Carr and constructed for speculation by Forest Hills developer New Hope Realty Co.


  • Jesse Harper Erwin Jr. House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1930

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    2822 Chelsea Cir.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    The granite exterior, five front gables along the street façade, and a polygonal tower facing the Hope Valley golf course distinguish Carr’s design for this sprawling Tudor Revival house.


  • John and Mattie Toms Buchanan House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    ca. 1940

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    1810 Cedar St.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Note:

    One of Carr’s more academic renditions of the Colonial Revival style, featuring a pedimented wing and modillion cornice, the Buchanan House is the largest residence in Forest Hills. The interior features a sweeping hanging staircase. Prominent businessman John Buchanan founded the Home Building and Loan Association and Home Insurance Agency, among his numerous Durham endeavors. Interiors for the 1990 movie “The Handmaid’s Tale” were filmed here.


  • Johnson House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1920s

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    617 Morehead Ave.

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982)

    Note:

    The 2 1/2-story brick Colonial Revival house, noted for its elegant entrance porch with Ionic columns and its Adamesque interior details, was built for Eric Johnson, owner of Johnson Motor Company, for whom Carr designed the downtown showroom.


  • Johnson Motor Company

    Contributors:
    George Watts Carr, Sr., architect; George Kane, contractor
    Dates:

    1927

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    326 E. Main St.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Commercial

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982)

    Note:

    Exemplifying the glamor of the early automobile age showrooms, the building features a limestone façade with elaborate copper and marble trim.


  • Julian S. Carr Junior High School

    Contributors:
    George Watts Carr, architect
    Dates:

    1922-1926

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    Morgan and Duke Sts.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Educational

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982)

    Note:

    The classically detailed red brick school building in downtown Durham (originally Central Junior High) was designed by Carr during his association with Northup and O’Brien. It is part of a complex that also includes the larger Durham High School of similar style, designed by Milburn and Heister, and later buildings.


  • McPherson House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1937

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    29 Oak Dr.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    The rambling frame Colonial Revival house in a tripartite configuration of two-story blocks was designed for Dr. Samuel Dace McPherson, Sr., and his family. He founded Durham’s McPherson Hospital, an eye, ear, nose, and throat hospital.


  • Parks Alexander House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1929-1930

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    24 Oak Dr.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    In contrast to the Colonial Revival design of most of the Forest Hills houses Carr designed, the Alexander House is a rambling Tudor Revival residence that demonstrates his ability with non-classical revival styles, a number of which are also found in Durham’s Hope Valley and Duke Forest neighborhoods.


  • Pinecrest (James O. Cobb House, Mary Duke Biddle House)

    Contributors:
    George Watts Carr, Sr., architect; Karl Bock, designer (late 1930s additions and interior remodeling)
    Dates:

    1927; 1936-1940

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    1044 W. Forest Hills Blvd.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    Carr designed the rambling two-story, brick Tudor Revival house for Forest Hills developer James O. Cobb in 1927. It featured cross-gable wings, casement and bay windows, and shed porches. Cobb lost the property in the Great Depression, and in 1935 it was purchased by Mary Duke Biddle, daughter of tobacco magnate Benjamin Duke, who had it altered by Karl Bock with additions and a remodeling of the interior with a mix of traditional and moderne elements.


  • Quail Hill

    Contributors:
    George Watts Carr, Sr., attributed architect
    Street Address:

    1001 Raleigh Rd.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    M. Ruth Little, The Town and Gown Architecture of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1795-1975 (2006).

    Note:

    The residence, inspired by the example of Colonial Williamsburg, was built for George Watts Hill, the illustrious business and civic leader, major supporter of the university, and key figure in the development of the Research Triangle Park. After Hill’s death, the place was used for a time as the university chancellor’s residence.


  • Richard H. Wright II House

    Contributors:
    George Watts Carr, architect
    Dates:

    1929

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    1429 N. Mangum St.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982)

    Note:

    Located in the prestigious Duke Park suburb, the large Colonial Revival residence with a Mount Vernon-inspired portico is among the city’s grandest houses in the popular revivalist style. It won Carr a NCAIA honor award in 1930. The client (1894-1980) was a nephew and business associate of Richard H. Wright (1851-1929), the Durham tobacco and utilities magnate.


  • Snow Building

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1933

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    333 W. Main St.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Commercial

    Images Published In:

    Ill. Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982)

    Note:

    One of the state’s most elegantly rendered Art Deco buildings, in a blend of that style with the Gothic Revival, the stone-faced commercial building with spiky roofline and intricate recessed entry was the product of the office of Northup and O’Brien, which was headed by George Watts Carr of Durham in the 1920s; after that office closed in 1929, Carr completed the building as part of his own practice. Further information is sought about the various architects’ roles in the design.


  • The Eloise

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1928

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    602 W. Chapel Hill St.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982)

    Note:

    Three-story, red brick apartment building prominently sited at the corner of two thoroughfares and featuring a neoclassical surround with swan’s neck pediment at the W. Chapel Hill St. entrance and a stylized Corinthian entrance porch on the S. Gregson St. side.


  • W. G. Pearson Elementary School

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1928

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    526 E. Umstead St.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Educational

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    Distinguished by the Art Moderne treatment of the stone surround of the main entrance and of the copper cornice, this is one of the most sophisticated designs for a public school building in Durham. Carr is credited with executing the design when he was manager of the Durham office of Northup and O’Brien. The school was built in the African American Stokesdale neighborhood and named in honor of a black businessman and educator.


  • William Branson House

    Contributors:
    George Watts Carr, Sr., architect; George Kane, contractor
    Dates:

    Ca. 1925

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    1552 Hermitage Ct.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).


  • William Muirhead House

    Contributors:
    George Watts Carr, Sr., architect; Muirhead Construction Company, contractor
    Dates:

    Ca. 1937

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    1010 Homer St.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    Unusual for its streamlined rendition of the Neoclassical Revival style, the Muirhead House stands apart from the other Forest Hills houses associated with Carr, most of them in the Colonial Revival style. Here, Carr modified plans the Muirheads had ordered from The New York Times.


  • William and Katherine Brownell House

    Contributors:
    Dates:

    1928

    Location:
    Durham, Durham County
    Street Address:

    3406 Dover Rd.

    Status:

    Standing

    Type:

    Residential

    Images Published In:

    Claudia Roberts [Brown] et al., The Durham Architectural And Historic Inventory (1982).

    Note:

    All but two of the ten speculative houses Carr designed for the New Hope Realty Co., developers of Hope Valley, are in the Colonial Revival style: this Tudor Revival Brownell House and the Spanish Colonial Revival D. T. Smith House.


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